Guesses at truth, by two brothers [A.W. and J.C. Hare. Publ. in two series, representing an expansion of vol. 1 of the work publ. in 1872].

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Taylor and Walton, 1848
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Page 83 - For whilst, to the shame of slow-endeavouring art, Thy easy numbers flow, and that each heart Hath, from the leaves of thy unvalued book, Those Delphic lines with deep impression took ; Then thou, our fancy of itself bereaving, Dost make us marble, with too much conceiving ; And, so sepulchred, in such pomp dost lie, That kings, for such a tomb, would wish to die.
Page 178 - I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them...
Page 117 - ... even that of the loftiest and seemingly that of the wildest odes, had a logic of its own, as severe as that of science, and more difficult, because more subtle, more complex, and dependent on more, and more fugitive, causes. In the truly great poets, he would say, there is a reason assignable not only for every word, but for the position of every word...
Page 77 - Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty, in both the last. The force of Nature could no farther go ; To make a third she joined the former two.
Page 210 - IT was the winter wild While the heaven-born Child All meanly wrapt in the rude manger lies; Nature in awe to him Had doffd her gaudy trim, With her great Master so to sympathize: It was no season then for her To wanton with the sun, her lusty paramour. Only with speeches fair She woos the gentle air To hide her guilty front with innocent snow; And on her naked shame, Pollute with sinful blame, The saintly veil of maiden white to throw; Confounded, that her Makers eyes Should look so near upon her...
Page 108 - Reason seemed the most to assert her rights, When most intent on making of herself A prime Enchantress — to assist the work, Which then was going forward in her name ! Not favoured spots alone, but the whole earth, The beauty wore of promise — that which sets (To take an image which was felt no doubt Among the bowers of paradise itself) The budding rose above the rose full blown.
Page 178 - Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, . Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun And descant on mine own deformity: And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, I am determined to prove a villain And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Page 183 - I see in my members another law at war with the law of my mind and making me captive to the law of sin which dwells in my members. Wretched man that I am ! Who will deliver me from this body of death...
Page 108 - The Swan on still St. Mary's Lake Floats double, Swan and Shadow...
Page 179 - GLOUCESTER'S Castle. Enter EDMUND, with a letter. Edm. Thou, Nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen moonshines Lag of a brother ? Why bastard ? wherefore base ? When my dimensions are as well compact, My mind as generous, and my shape as true, As honest madam's issue ? Why brand they us With base? with baseness ? bastardy? base, base?

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