Chosön; the Land of the Morning Calm: A Sketch of Korea

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Ticknor, 1886 - Korea - 412 pages
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"25 Albertype plates from photographs of Korea by Percival Lowell. Forbes Albertype Co., Boston, did the plates. This copy also contains two handwritten notes by Lowell laid in. One is of autobiograhical interest as Lowell gives a short resume in his career to this date. The pictures by him, as reproduced by the Forbes company, are striking and the tonal range of the collotypes is particularly effective in this book." -- Hanson collection catalog, p. 88.
 

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Page 266 - ... spirals, coiled together, filling the area of a circle. They are emblematic of the positive and negative essences of Chinese philosophy. Above them is the representation of tongues of flame. All this typifies the power of the king, joined, since the nation espoused the morality of Confucius, with a reverence for the sage. As the name implies, the whole is painted a bright red, which, in Korea, is the kingly color. Its height is from thirty to forty feet. Its situation is striking. It rises by...
Page 265 - For in the aboriginal faith, unchanged to this day, the king is the lineal descendant of the gods, and their representative and mediator to men ; and so, because of his genealogy, it was erected as an outer portal to his gates. Nor did the custom stop there. His glory was reflected upon those who carried out his will, — the official class. From his mansion it was copied for theirs, so that now the distinctive mark of a magistracy is the Red Arrow Gate.
Page 107 - It is because the farEast holds up the mirror to our own civilization, — a mirror that like all mirrors gives us back left for right, — because by her very oddities, as they strike us at first, we learn truly to criticise, examine, and realize our own way of doing things, that she is so very interesting.
Page 49 - Two men carry the box, and divide the burden between their arms and backs by means of a yoke with straps that fit over the ends of the poles to which the box is fastened.
Page 296 - ... was laid out, therefore, the palace was given the post of honor, — the northern end of the space enclosed by the city's wall ; and, when the second palace came to be built, it was placed as nearly north as was possible consistently with the position of the older one, to whose left, reckoned as facing the city, it lay. Exactly what was the origin of this custom of allotting a rank among themselves to the cardinal points, it would be interesting to know. We may, perhaps, look to some rude astronomy...
Page 266 - ... crossing by still a fourth. All four are perfectly straight. Starting from the lower and projecting beyond the upper horizontal piece, are a row of vertical beams of wood, spear-shaped. These are the arrows of the name. In the centre is a design as singular to the eye as it is peculiar for its mystic meaning, — two spirals coiled together, filling the area of a circle.
Page 382 - Chinaman when he was born, he answers that it was in the year of the rat, the ox, the tiger, the hare, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the cock, the dog, the bear, or, as some say, the pig.
Page 266 - In the centre is a design as singular to the eye as it is peculiar for its mystic meaning, — two spirals coiled together, filling the area of a circle. They are emblematic of the positive and negative essences of Chinese philosophy. Above them is the representation of tongues of flame. All this typifies the power of the king, joined, since the nation espoused the morality of Confucius, with a reverence for the sage. As the name implies, the whole is painted a bright red, which in Korea is the kingly...
Page 265 - Originally the portal to Shinto shrines, it was borrowed by Buddhism, and now guards indifferently the approach to buildings of either religion. In this it differs entirely from the use to which it is put in Korea, for there it never does service to Buddhist temples. At first sight, the reason is perhaps not evident ; yet its use in the one land explains collaterally its use in the other, and points to a primitive idea, of which both are natural though different applications. In Japan, the mikado...
Page 296 - The fourteen are only outer gates; within are innumerable others ; and no gate is without a name. Sometimes the names are simply aesthetic ; sometimes they are moral sentiments taken from Confucianism. The inner life of the people is so entirely in theory only a mixture of the two ideas, — the good and the beautiful, — and the veneration for a name so universal, that there is no structure above the most ordinary kind but has its distinct ennobling proper name. occupy the space not otherwise built...

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