I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution

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Penguin, Sep 25, 2012 - Social Science - 608 pages
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Remember When All You Wanted Was Your MTV? The perfect gift for the music fan or child of the eighties in your life.

Named One of the Best Books of 2011 by NPR – Spin - USA Today – CNBC - Pitchfork - The Onion - The Atlantic - The Huffington Post – VEVO - The Boston Globe - The San Francisco Chronicle


Remember the first time you saw Michael Jackson dance with zombies in "Thriller"? Diamond Dave karate kick with Van Halen in "Jump"? Tawny Kitaen turning cartwheels on a Jaguar to Whitesnake's "Here I Go Again"? The Beastie Boys spray beer in "(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (To Party)"? Axl Rose step off the bus in "Welcome to the Jungle"?

It was a pretty radical idea-a channel for teenagers, showing nothing but music videos. It was such a radical idea that almost no one thought it would actually succeed, much less become a force in the worlds of music, television, film, fashion, sports, and even politics. But it did work. MTV became more than anyone had ever imagined.

I Want My MTV tells the story of the first decade of MTV, the golden era when MTV's programming was all videos, all the time, and kids watched religiously to see their favorite bands, learn about new music, and have something to talk about at parties. From its start in 1981 with a small cache of videos by mostly unknown British new wave acts to the launch of the reality-television craze with The Real World in 1992, MTV grew into a tastemaker, a career maker, and a mammoth business.

Featuring interviews with nearly four hundred artists, directors, VJs, and television and music executives, I Want My MTV is a testament to the channel that changed popular culture forever.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Iambookish - LibraryThing

MTV, one of my favorite things about the 80's. The hair, the shoulder pads, the music videos....reading this book brought me right back to those times. Duran Duran, Cindy Lauper, Culture Club, Pat ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Caryn.Rose - LibraryThing

This is impeccably researched and constructed but I discovered that I was far less interested in the subject than it takes to be enthralled for 572 pages. It wasnt the writers, it was this reader. If ... Read full review

Contents

Its the Greatest Thing in the World
1
We Were Just Idiots in Hotel Rooms
14
Whats a VJ?
31
A Total Unmitigated Disaster
40
A Hail Mary Pass
48
Pouting and Shoulder Pads
85
Shut That Door
103
They Figured out a Whole New Persona
115
Hickory Dickory Dock This Bitch Was
284
The Island of Misfit Toys
317
Martha Was Heartbroken
330
A True Television Network
345
Thats What Hype Can Do to You
358
People in the Hood Rushed to Get Cable
379
Weve Always Loved Guns N Roses
396
Those Harem Pants Came Out of Nowhere
410

That Racism Bullshit
136
The Two Ms
159
You Got Charasma
167
Hes Got a Metal Plate in His Head
190
Why Dont I Just Take 50000 and Light It on Fire?
206
A Whopping Steaming Turd
216
No Cable Network Is Worth 500 Million
227
Gacked to the Tits
237
His Name Is David Fincher Hes a Genius
252
There I Am with My Rack
266
The Legion of Decency
278
EgoFuckingManiacs
422
Rhythm Nation
440
Your Managers an Asshole
453
Silly Superficial and Wonderful
463
A Monkey Could Do It
474
A Pep Rally Gone Wrong
481
Youre No Better Than a Rabbit
498
Fat City
512
Acknowledgments
527
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Craig Marks was the top editor for two influential music magazines, SPIN and Blender. He is the editor in chief of Popdust.

Rob Tannenbaum has been the music editor at Blender, a columnist at GQ, and has written for The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Details, New York Magazine, Playboy, Spin, and The Washington Post.

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