Working Women in English Society, 1300-1620

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 2, 2005 - Business & Economics - 291 pages
This study explores the diverse and changing ways in which English women participated in the market economy from 1300 to 1620. Using substantial new evidence it challenges both traditional views of this 'golden age' for women's work and more recent critiques. The author argues that women's engagement in the market economy fluctuated widely under the pressures of demographic, economic, social and cultural change. Although women enjoyed unprecedented opportunities following the plagues of 1348 9, these opportunities had largely been eroded once again by the late sixteenth century.
 

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User Review  - Angelic55blonde - LibraryThing

This is a great book that focuses on women who worked during the early modern time period in England. Her main argument is that the level of women's participation in the economy varied and that even ... Read full review

Contents

Womens work in its social setting
Studying working women
4
how have scholars interpreted the sources?
18
3 Continuity and change
27
Providing services
33
Domestic and personal services
33
1 Livein servants
33
2 Taking in boarders
41
Drink work
114
1 Brewing ale
119
2 Aleselling
130
3 Beer wine and taverns
137
were women displaced from the drink trades around 1500?
144
The food trades and innkeeping
156
2 Other foods
162
3 Innkeeping
174

3 Nonresidential household employment sex work and health care
52
Financial services and real estate
65
2 Lending money
76
3 Pawning goods
81
4 Renting out property
88
Making and selling goods
91
General features of womens work as producers and sellers
93
1 Characteristics of production and sale
94
2 Apprenticeship
107
Womens participation in the skilled crafts
182
2 Other crafts
194
Turning the coin women as consumers
199
Conclusion
208
Appendices
212
Bibliography
230
Index
246
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Marjorie K. McIntosh is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her previous publications include A Community Transformed: The Manor and Liberty of Havering, 1500-1620 (1991) and Controlling Misbehavior in England, 1370-1600 (1998).