Paxton's Magazine of Botany, and Register of Flowering Plants, Volume 16

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Sir Joseph Paxton
Orr and Smith, 1849 - Botany
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Periodical devoted to the illustration in colour of new and uncommon plants grown in British gardens; although primarily horticultural in appeal, it contains the first descriptions of many new species.
 

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Page 126 - Manna, young and strong shoots are requisite ; but they are not tapped till the tree ceases to push forth any more leaves, and the sap consequently collects in the stem. This period is recognised by the cultivators from the appearance of the leaves ; sometimes it occurs earlier than at others, and the collection of the Manna takes place either at the beginning of July or only in August. Close to the soil cross sections are made in the stem, and in the lowermost sections small leaves...
Page 125 - Oadal tree is very common, and the rope is made most readily ; the bark, or rather all the layers, can be stripped off from the bottom to the top of the tree with the greatest facility, and fine pliable ropes may be made from the inner layers of bark, whilst the outer yield coarse ropes. The rope is very strong and very lasting — wet doing it little injury.
Page 259 - ... produced, it subsides, and in process of time leaves the water above perfectly clear. The subsided matter is nothing but chalk. " What occurs in this operation will be understood, if we suppose that one pound of chalk, after being burned to nine ounces of...
Page 126 - This period is recognised by the cultivators from the appearance of the leaves ; sometimes it occurs earlier than at others, and the collection of the manna takes place either at the beginning of July or only in August. Close to the soil cross sections are made in the stem, and in the lowermost sections small leaves are inserted, which conduct the sap into a receptacle formed by a cactus leaf : this is the way the manna in sorte is obtained.
Page 263 - Kuba, with the rising sun, and proceeded through picturesque fields covered with rose trees. The exquisite fragrance emitted by them, and which the morning dew rendered more fresh and grateful; the varied warbling of a multitude of birds, who had their nests in these delightful bowers ; and the sight of several cascades, whose playful waters leaped from their steep summits, produced on every sense an indescribable feeling of delight. One of the nobles belonging to the suite of Ashan Khan made me...
Page 259 - ... but it must combine with seven additional ounces of that acid. In such a state of combination chalk exists in the waters of London, dissolved, invisible, and colourless, like salt in water. A pound of chalk, dissolved in 560 gallons of water by seven ounces of carbonic acid, would form a solution not sensibly different, in ordinary use, from the filtered water of the Thames, in the average state of that river.
Page 259 - These nine ounces of caustic lime and seven ounces of carbonic acid form sixteen ounces, that is, one pound of chalk, which, being insoluble in water, becomes visible, at the same time that the other pound of chalk, being deprived of the extra seven ounces of carbonic acid that kept it in solution, reappears. Both pounds of chalk will be found at the bottom after subsidence. The 540 gallons of water will remain above, clear and colourless, without holding in solution any sensible quantity either...
Page 263 - ... plant and manure them every month. But roses are planted in various ways; some transplant them with the root entire ; others take them up with the root, and cut them down to the size of four fingers in length, and plant all that is cut off the roots, and what grows from them, at the distance of one foot and a half from each other. Some weave wreaths of rose plants, and plant them for the sake of their fragrance. But we ought to recollect that roses will have more fragrance when they are grown...
Page 134 - Now it is wonderful to observe how small a quantity of a compound body is decomposed by a certain portion of electricity. Let us, for instance, consider this and a few other points in relation to water. One grain of water, acidulated to facilitate conduction, will require an electric current to be continued for three minutes and three quarters of time to effect its decomposition, which current must be powerful enough to retain a platina wire TúT of an inch in thickness...
Page 221 - In March, 1827, Dr. Wallich accompanied the British Envoy to Ava, and in his Official Report of a Journey on the River Saluen...

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