Return of Depression Economics

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2009 - 176 pages
22 Reviews
In this book, pub. in 1999, acclaimed economic Paul Krugman gives us a sobering tour of the global economic crises of the previous two years, from the collapse of six Asian economies incl. Japan in July 1997; to the failure of the Russian economy; the Federal Reserve Board┐s bailout in the U.S. of the over-leveraged Long-Term Capital Management Corp.; and Brazil┐s currency crisis in early 1999. In the 1930s policymakers realized that they had to limit the free market in order to save it. By 1999, when governments worldwide had spent decades lifting regulatory restraints on trade within and across their borders, interference in markets was completely out of favor as a policy tool. Krugman suggests that a variety of capital restraints may well be in order.
 

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Review: The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008

User Review  - Riley - Goodreads

This book seemed a little slapped together to capture the fame of Paul Krugman's 2008 Nobel Prize. Nonetheless, I think it offered a lot of insight. I was struck by the following passage, in which ... Read full review

Review: The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

Krugman delivers an easy to read, somewhat logical, explanation of the 2008 crisis. His explanation of the way the events happened in each chapter were pretty much spot on. He seemed to have an ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
About This Book
6
THE CENTRAL PROBLEM HAS BEEN SOLVED
9
WARNING IGNORED LATIN AMERICAS CRISES
30
JAPANS TRAP
56
ASIAS CRASH
77
POLICY PERVERSITY
101
MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE
119
GREENSPANS BUBBLES
139
BANKING IN THE SHADOWS
153
THE SUM OF ALL FEARS
165
THE RETURN OF DEPRESSION ECONOMICS
181
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
193

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About the author (2009)

Paul Krugman was born on February 28, 1953. He received a B.S. in economics from Yale University in 1974 and a Ph.D from MIT in 1977. From 1982 to 1983, he worked at the Reagan White House as a member of the Council of Economic Advisers. He taught at numerous universities including Yale University, MIT, UC Berkeley, the London School of Economics, and Stanford University before becoming a professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University in 2000. He has written over 200 scholarly papers and 20 books including Peddling Prosperity; International Economics: Theory and Policy; The Great Unraveling; and The Conscience of a Liberal. Since 2000, he has written a twice-weekly column for The New York Times. He received the 1991 John Bates Clark Medal and the 2008 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

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