The Food Problem

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Macmillan, 1917 - Food - 211 pages
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Page xi - That is the future of war — not fighting, but famine, not the slaying of men, but the bankruptcy of nations and the break-up of the whole social organization.
Page vii - AnuthiT impressive observation brought out by food difficulties is that of our intimate dependence on our domestic animals We are likely to think first of the supply of cereals, and, indeed, it must be admitted that bread is the very basis of the food supply of a people. But we do not sufficiently realize the equally critical importance of maintenance of our domestic animals in a period of food shortage. We cannot even raise our own young without them. Nor if a nation is robbed of its animals can...
Page 27 - Realizing that the operation of Government control in wheat and rye is essential under present war influences in order to adequately protect our home supply and furnish our Allies with the aid we owe, and realizing that the establishment of an efficient Government plan of operation means to all of us curtailment of our business and to some of us actual retirement from active business during such period, we do express our pride in the character of service tendered by the grain trade in the sacrifice...
Page 23 - That the President is authorized and directed to commandeer any or all distilled spirits in bond or in stock at the date of the approval of this Act for redistillation, in so far as such redistillation may be necessary to meet the requirements of the Government in the manufacture of munitions and other military and hospital supplies, or in...
Page 218 - To formulate for lay-students of public affairs certain minimum aims and steps which are entirely within the reach of the general public is the purpose of this book. It is not for specialists although it lists ways in which the country can secure public-spirited service from its specialists in peace as well as in war.
Page xi - Food is always more or less of a problem in every phase of its production, handling and consumption. It is a problem with every farmer, every transporter and seller, every householder. It is a problem with every town, state and nation. And now very conspicuously, it is a problem with three great groups, namely, the Allies, The Central Empires and The Neutrals; in a word it is a great international problem.
Page 210 - ... themselves. And all the time, they are fighting and making munitions, and doing all the thousand urgent and serious things necessary for the efficiency of their millions of fighters in the field — and for their comfort when they come back to 'Blighty.' VI Patriotism and food! Winning a world-war by eating corn and chicken instead of wheat and beef! It will take much education to get this point of view. An army of food-savers does not appeal to the imagination at first consideration. But remember...
Page 11 - ... compare now the actual figures (obtained from official sources, and as nearly accurate as may be had) of the probable cereal production of the Western Allies for the year, together with those of their normal consumption, with the figures just quoted, we shall see the situation clearly and exactly. The production of the Allies this year is closely estimated as follows: wheat, 393,770,000 bushels; other cereals, 567,016,000 bushels. Their normal consumption is: wheat, 974,485,000; other cereals...
Page 23 - ... and any of these stocks may be redistilled to meet the requirements of the government in the manufacture of munitions and military and hospital supplies. Particular powers are given in regard to the production of and dealing in coal and coke. Prices may be fixed. If these prices are not conformed to, the mine or plant and business of the offending producer may be taken over. If deemed necessary, the producer of coal and coke may be required to sell solely to the government, and the government...
Page 15 - ... five and a half millions; a problem in arithmetic — and eating! IV We have outlined one phase, the international one, of the food-problem. But there is another. It is the national, or domestic one. This ties up closely, of course, with the wider aspect of the problem. Indeed, it is to a large extent immediately caused by the attempt at provisioning the Allies, in the uncontrolled manner in which the attempt has been made from the beginning of the war up to now. The more nearly the "Allies —...

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