The Mercury 13: The Untold Story of Thirteen American Women and the Dream of Space Flight

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Thorndike Press, 2003 - History - 434 pages
40 Reviews
In 1961, Martha Ackmann and twelve other remarkable women secretly tested and passed the same battery of tests as the Mercury 7 astronauts, but were summarily dismissed at NASA and on Capitol Hill.

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Review: The Mercury 13: The True Story of Thirteen Women and the Dream of Space Flight

User Review  - Goodreads

I want to thank the Mercury 13 for proving that women are capable and can do anything they put their minds to do. Read full review

Review: The Mercury 13: The True Story of Thirteen Women and the Dream of Space Flight

User Review  - Nicole CeBallos - Goodreads

I would do anything to be able to go to space. I had heard a little about the Mercury 13 and wanted to find out more, so I picked up the book. I read it in less than a day. I have read thorough WASP ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Martha Ackmann teaches at Mount Holyoke College, is a frequent columnist, and has written for publications including The New York Times, The Boston Globe, the Chicago Tribune, and the Los Angeles Times. Ackmann is co-recipient of the Amelia Earhart Research Scholars Grant. She lives in western Massachusetts.
Lynn Sherr, correspondent for the ABC News program 20/20, covered NASA and the space program in the 1980s, anchoring and reporting on all the early shuttle missions, through the Challenger explosion and the subsequent Rogers Commission hearings. Sherr was a semifinalist in the (now abandoned) Journalist-in-Space competition. She lives in New York.

"From the Hardcover edition.

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