Poisonous Plants of Paradise: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Injuries from Hawaií's Plants

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University of Hawaii Press, 2000 - Health & Fitness - 178 pages
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Can swallowing a poinsettia leaf kill you? Why do you have to cook taro before you eat it? Is cooking with oleander wood really dangerous? Poisonous Plants of Paradise, a well-researched and generously illustrated guide to potentially harmful plants in Hawai'i, answers these questions and many more in everyday language and in a user-friendly format.

Of value to both medical professionals and the general public, this handbook describes each plant in words and color photos, then identifies the plant's toxins, mechanism of injury, incidence, signs and symptoms, and traditional and modern uses. The authors offer first aid recommendations and discuss advanced medical treatment based on the latest published literature.

Health-care workers, naturalists, hikers, parents, and child-care providers will find Poisonous Plants of Paradise a highly useful and informative reference.

 

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Contents

and Rivina humilis
147
Notes and References
161
References Cited
167

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Susan Scott maintains and international consulting practice through her firm, Fierce Conversations Inc., which provides Fierce Leadership, and Fierce Coaching programs to CEO's and executives. For fourteen years, she ran think tanks and seminars for business leaders through The Executive Committee (TEC) International. Scott was raised in Tennessee and now lives in Seattle, Washington.

Thomas has practiced emergency medicine in Hawaii since 1983. He is a member of the clinical faculty at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii; president of Hawaii Emergency Physicians, Associated, Inc.,; and medical director for the Honolulu Fire Department and the Honolulu Police Department.

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