Sons and Lovers

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Penguin, Dec 6, 2005 - Fiction - 432 pages
D. H. Lawrence’s great autobiographical novel paints a provocative portrait of an artist torn between affection for his mother and desire for two beautiful women. Set in the Nottinghamshire coalfields of Lawrence’s own boyhood, the story follows young Paul Morel’s growth into manhood in a British working-class family.

Gertrude Morel, Paul’s puritanical mother, concentrates all her love and attention on Paul, nurturing his talents as a painter. When she muses that he might marry someday and desert her, the attentive son swears he will never leave her. Then Paul falls in love—with not one woman but two—and must eventually choose between them.…
 

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SONS AND LOVERS

User Review  - Kirkus

When Sons and Lovers was first seen by its reading public in 1913, its publishers had in fact, out of caution and timidity, shortened Lawrence's originally submitted version by about ten percent—cuts ... Read full review

Review: Sons and Lovers

User Review  - Steve TK - Goodreads

This semi-autobiographical novel is important in understanding Lawrence's relationships to class, to his mother, and to love and sex. And it's a remarkably modern read, considering that it was ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page Copyright Page Introduction
PART
The Early Married Life of the Morels
The Birth of Paul and Another Battle
The Casting Off of MorelThe Taking On of William
The Young Life of Paul
Paul Launches into Life
Death in the Family
Defeat of Miriam
Clara
The Test on Miriam
Passion
Baxter Dawes
The Release
Derelict
Afterword

PART
LadandGirl Love
Strife in Love

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About the author (2005)

The son of a miner, the prolific novelist, poet, and travel writer David Herbert Lawrence was born in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, in 1885. He attended Nottingham University and found employment as a schoolteacher. His first novel, The White Peacock, was published in 1911, the same year his beloved mother died and he quit teaching to devote himself to writing. The next year Lawrence published Sons and Lovers and ran off to Germany with Frieda Weekley, his former tutor’s wife; they married in 1914. Suffering from tuberculosis, he was in constant flight from his ill health, traveling through Europe and around the world by way of Australia and Mexico, settling for a time in Taos, NM. During his life, he produced more than forty volumes of fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, philosophy and travel writing. Among his most famous works are The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920) and Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928). He died in 1930 in Venice.

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