Evolution, Old and New: Or, the Theories of Buffon, Dr. Erasmus Darwin, and Lamarck, as Compared with that of Mr. Charles Darwin

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Hardwicke and Bogue, 1879 - Electronic books - 384 pages
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"Of all the questions now engaging the attention of those whose destiny has commanded them to take more or less exercise of mind, I know of none more interesting than that which deals with what is called teleology--that is to say, with design or purpose, as evidenced by the different parts of animals and plants. The question may be briefly stated thus: Can we or can we not see signs in the structure of animals and plants, of something which carries with it the idea of contrivance so strongly that it is impossible for us to think of the structure, without at the same time thinking of contrivance, or design, in connection with it? It is my object in the present work to answer this question in the affirmative, and to lead my reader to agree with me, perhaps mainly, by following the history of that opinion which is now supposed to be fatal to a purposive view of animal and vegetable organs. I refer to the theory of evolution or descent with modification"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
 

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Page 230 - ... would it be too bold to imagine, that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions, and associations; and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity-, and of delivering down those improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Page 13 - PETER, VS HORSE WARRANTY : A Plain and Comprehensive Guide to the various Points to be noted, showing which are essential and which are unimportant. With Forms of Warranty. Fcap. 8vo, cloth, 3*.
Page 248 - The work, from its powerful and brilliant style, though displaying in the earlier editions little accurate knowledge and a great want of scientific caution, immediately had a very wide circulation. In my opinion it has done excellent service in this country in calling attention to the subject, in removing prejudice, and in thus preparing the ground for the reception of analogous views.
Page 20 - THE POPULAR SCIENCE REVIEW: A Quarterly Summary of Scientific Progress and Miscellany of Entertaining and Instructive Articles on Scientific Subjects. Edited by WS DALLAS, FLS, Assistant Secretary of the Geological Society. In addition to Articles which are of abiding interest, the POPULAR SCIENCE REVIEW contains a Complete Record of Progress in every Department of Science, including : ASTRONOMY. BOTANY. CHEMISTRY. ETHNOLOGY.
Page 331 - ... any existing species — animal or vegetable — when placed under conditions different from its previous ones, immediately begins to undergo certain changes of structure fitting it for the new conditions. They can show that in successive generations these changes continue, until ultimately the new conditions become the natural ones. They can show that in cultivated plants, in domesticated animals, and in the several races of men, such alterations have taken place.
Page 364 - In the literal sense of the word, no doubt, Natural Selection is a false term; but who ever objected to chemists speaking of the elective affinities of the various elements ? — and yet an acid cannot strictly be said to elect the base with which it in preference combines.
Page 25 - Introduction, explaining the purpose of the present Course, and its use in Schools, or for Home Study. — Part II. Lecture I. The first Elements of Mechanical Physics. Lecture II. Mechanical Physics (continued). — Part III. Lecture III. Mechanical Physics (concluded}. Lecture IV. Chemical Physics.— Part IV.
Page 19 - Birds, Humming Birds, 3 Vols., Game Birds, Pigeons, Parrots, Birds of Western Africa, 2 Vols., Fly-Catchers, Pheasants and Peacocks, &c. ANIMALS, 14 Vols. Introduction, Lions and Tigers, British Quadrupeds, Dogs, 2 Vols. , Horses, Ruminating Animals, 2 Vols. , Elephants, Marsupialia, Seals, Whales, Monkeys, and Man. INSECTS, 7 Vols. Introduction to Entomology, British Butterflies and Moths, 2 Vols., Foreign Butterflies and Moths, 2 Vols., Beetles, Bees. FISHES, 6 Vols. Introduction and Foreign Fishes,...
Page 12 - ... the absurdity of this answer. But suppose I had found a watch upon the ground, and it should be inquired how the watch happened to be in that place, I should hardly think of the answer which I had before given, that for any thing I knew the watch might have always been there.
Page 375 - ... the wingless condition of so many Madeira beetles is mainly due to the action of natural selection, combined probably with disuse. For during many successive generations each individual beetle which flew least, either from its wings having been ever so little less perfectly developed or from indolent habit, will have had the best chance of surviving from not being blown out to sea...

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