The Sacred Town of Sankhu: The Anthropology of Newar Ritual, Religion and Society in Nepal

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Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Mar 15, 2012 - Performing Arts - 635 pages
This book presents a detailed view of Newar society and culture, and its socio-economic, socio-religious and ritual aspects, concentrating on the Newar town of Sankhu in the Valley of Nepal. The foundation of the town of Sankhu is attributed to the goddess Vajrayoginī, venerated by both Buddhists and Hindus in Nepal and beyond. Myths, history, and topographical details of the town and the sanctuary of the goddess Vajrayoginī and her cult are discussed on the basis of published sources, unpublished chronicles, and inscriptions.

The book deals with the relation between Hinduism and Buddhism, with the interrelations between the Newar castes (jāt), caste-bound associations (sī guthi), and above all with the numerous socio-religious associations (guthi) that uphold ritual life of the Newars. All major and minor Newar feasts, festivals, dances, fasts and processions of gods and goddesses are discussed.

 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE
1
CHAPTER TWO
13
CHAPTER THREE
21
CHAPTER FOUR
42
CHAPTER FIVE
61
APPENDIX TO CHAPTER FIVE
102
CHAPTER SIX
105
CHAPTER SEVEN
137
CHAPTER ELEVEN
328
CHAPTER TWELVE
343
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
390
APPENDIX TO CHAPTER THIRTEEN
444
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
446
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
507
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
523
NOTES
532

APPENDIX TO CHAPTER SEVEN
179
CHAPTER EIGHT
183
CHAPTER NINE
199
CHAPTER TEN
266
BIBLIOGRAPHY
555
GLOSSARY
580
INDEX
593
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Dr Bal Gopal Shrestha is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA), and Associate with Wolfson College, University of Oxford, UK. He has been Visiting Fellow at the Department of History, University of Leiden, The Netherlands (2007–8). He was Researcher and Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences, Leiden University, and taught Politics of South and Southeast Asia (2006–07). He was Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Fondazione Centro Incontri Umani, Ascona, Switzerland (2004–6). The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge, UK awarded him a Frederick Williamson Memorial Fund (2003). The University of Leiden awarded him a PhD fellowship (1996–2002). He made the award-winning ethnographic documentary Sacrifice of Serpents: The Festival of Indrayani, Kathmandu 1992/94 (Leiden, 1997) together with the late Van den Hoek and Dirk J. Nijland. In 1993 he joined the Centre for Nepal and Asian Studies, Tribhuvan University, Nepal as a lecturer. He has conducted fieldwork in Nepal and India, and has published widely on Nepalese religious rituals, Hinduism, Buddhism, ethnic nationalism, the Maoist movement, and political development in Nepal.

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