A Grammar of the Homeric Dialect

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Clarendon Press, 1882 - Greek language - 344 pages
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Contents

The Simple NonThematic Present
10
The Simple NonThematic Aorist n 14 Metathesis
11
The NonThematic Reduplicated Present
12
The Presents with vi vd and w It 18 Thematic forms sporadic
13
NonThematic Contracted VerbsPresents
14
Aorists
16
Reduplication
18
The forms of the 3 Plural
19
Long and Short Stems
20
Thematic forms 91
22
The Simple Thematic Present
23
With Short Stem
24
The Thematic Aorist
25
Doubtful forms
26
Thematic Aorists in Homer
27
Stems with in the Present note
28
The three forms of еясЬ Hoot
29
TenseStems formed by a Suffix 3
30
The Aorist in оч что Thematic
31
Passive Aoriststhe Aor in TJV
32
Suffixes of the PresentStem
33
Nasal Class ve vo c
34
Epenthesis
36
3 Assimilation of у
37
Contraction
39
Collateral forms of the Present in Homer
40
The Future in aw 4
41
The Future in rw 4a 65 Futures from Perfect and Aorist Stems
42
The Augment Historical Tenses
43
The Pluperfect
44
Meaning of the Present and Aorist Stems
45
Essentially progressive action
46
Past process the Imperfect
47
Aorist Participle coincidence
48
The Moode 79 The MoodsInfinitive and Participle
49
Si Contraction
50
8з Thematic TenseStems
51
The Verbal Nouns
53
The Participle
54
Accent in Composition
56
Nominal and Pronominal Stems
57
The Vocative
58
CasesThe Nominative Singular
59
The Genitive Singular
60
The Dative Singular
61
The Genitive Plural
62
The Dual
63
0об Variation of the Stem
64
Htroclite Pronouns
66
Adverbial Endings
68
in Accentuation of Nouns
69
The Vocative
70
Formation of Nouns 113 Nominal StemsPrimary and Secondary
71
Accentuation
75
Gender
76
117 Secondary Suffixes
77
Compound Suffixes
78
Gender
79
ill Comparison of Adjectives
81
Meaning of Comparatives and Superlatives
82
Form of the Second Stem
85
Meaning of Compound
86
Stems compounded with Prepositions
88
Proper Names
89
Numerals 9
90
Relation of Nouns and Pronouns to the Verb
92
Neuter Adjectives
93
Other Adverbial Accusatives
94
Accusative of the part affected
95
of the External Object
96
Double Accusatives
97
ThetrueDative
98
The Instrumental Dative
99
The Locatival Dative
100
The Genitive
102
in the Predicate
104
of IЧас IO4 150 of Time
105
The Ablatival Genitive
108
loi The NominativeImpersonal Verb
113
Nominative in the Predicate 114
114
Interjectional Nominative
115
The Vocative
116
Substantive and Adjective
117
Pronouns
118
Implied Predication
119
Plural of Things
120
Neuter Plural with Singular Verb
121
The Dual
122
The Preposition 174 Drfmiuon
123
Ellipse of the Verb 124
124
Use with Oblique Cases
125
The Genitive of Price 109
126
d 29 182 рф1 with the Dative
129
Accusative 130
130
Genitive
131
Genitive
133
mip with the Dative
134
i Genitive 135
135
IUT I35 194 ltr with the Dative
136
197 137 198 Ы with the Dative
137
Accusative
138
aoo Genitive
139
m with the Dative
140
Genitive
141
irpori irps 1roT
142
vwith the Dat with the Gen
143
ката
144
Genitive
145
8ia
146
Ы iv
147
l 148 224 v
148
p
149
Double Prepositions 140
150
Homeric and Attic uses
151
The Verbal Nouns 230 Nature of the Verbal Noun
153
The CaseEndingф1у
154
Instrumental
155
Tenses of the Participle
166
The Genitive Absolute
167
Subordinate Clauses
168
65f ToaoaSf rowaSf itt ivaSt
169
otros
170
The Reflexive Pronoun
171
The Possessive loi St
172
ios of as a general Reflexive
173
The Article 175
175
The Substantival Article
176
The Attributive
178
With Adjectives
179
The defining Article
181
The Article as a Relative
182
The Article with T
184
as ij
185
us т os ns
186
Correlative Clauses
187
owfxa
188
3 on T
189
6 ort о Tf as Conjunctions
191
Form of the Relative Clause
192
Double Relative Clauses
193
Classification of Sentences
194
The Subjunctive in Principal Clauses
196
Affirmative
197
Negative
198
Interrogative
199
Homeric and Attic uses
201
Clauses with dj
202
Relative ClausesFinal
203
Conditional
204
Relative Adverbs
206
fra
207
fair 45
208
Clauses with fi c
210
Conditional Protasis
211
Final Clauses with ct
212
The Subjunctive with is ei
213
irpir
214
The Optative in Simple Sentences
215
With ay or xiv 217
217
The Optative in Subordinate Clauses
219
Clauses with jic
220
Relative ClausesFinal
221
Conditional
222
ш? owof tva
223
tars Ифра
224
TC JTTt 22д 309 Jre
226
elConditional Protasis
227
ft KtvConditional Protasis
228
History of the Subjunctive and Optative Une in Principal Clauses
229
Original meaning
231
Conditional Protasis with tl
232
Final Clauses with ei
233
i yc
234
The IndicativeModal Use
235
Conditional Apodosie
236
Past Tense by Assimilation
237
The Imperative 739
238
Prohibition
239
Classification of the Particles
240
3jo itai
241
т t in general statement
242
24S 334 5t of the Apodosis
245
Enclitic S
246
iAXr airар тар
247
TIIJ i4
248
Dependent Interrogative
250
3425 fiar pfr v
251
ro 252
252
349352 ofa Ц vv tjv
255
ir
257
354 7 258 355 u 7distinction of usage
259
Uses of Я7Indicative
260
oil and 117 in Conditional Clauses
261
o with the Infinitive and Participle
263
Difference of a and KV
265
Original meaning of v
268
itlvJSolic dialect
269
Metre and Quantity 366 The Hexameter
270
Spondaic verses 372
272
Quantity of Syllables 373
273
Lengthening before p ц v a 5
275
Origin of the lengthening
276
Final ч of the Dat Sing
278
Short Syllables ending in a Consonant 279
279
Elision etc
281
Synizeeis
282
Long vowels before Hiatus
283
Shortening of diphthongs before Hiatus
284
Doubtful Syllables
285
Doubtful vowels
286
Metrical licence
287
The Digamma
288
Words with initial f
289
Words with initial af p
296
f inferred from metre only 297
297
Loss of f esp before o w
298
Initial Sf
300
f not initial
301
Summary
302
Theories of the Digamma
303
Hypothesis of alternative forms
304
Hiatus c as a survival
305
f in other Greek dialects
306
f in Ionic
308
APPENDIX A On the Tenses with Stems ending in
310
B On г in Verbal Stems
314
On ч and in Homer
316
On the Assimilated forms 55
318
E Order of the Particles and Enclitic Pronouns
319
Other Notes and Corrections
320
Homeric Forms
323
Subjects including Syntax
335
Chief passages referred to
342

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Page xxiii - A GRAMMAR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE, FROM PLAUTUS TO SUETONIUS. By HENRY JOHN ROBY, MA, late Fellow of St.
Page 275 - position," we may start from the following statement by Dr. Monro (HG 344, repeated, Odyssey, 333):— " Neglect of Position is perceptibly commoner in the Odyssey than in the Iliad. Apart from cases in which the necessities of metre can be pleaded, viz. proper names and words beginning with -> it will be found that the proportion of examples is about 3:1. It will be seen, too, that some marked instances occur in and H.
Page 258 - ... is used like -nip to emphasize a particular word or phrase. It does not however intensify the meaning, or insist on the fact as true, but only calls attention to the word or fact. ... In a Conditional Protasis (with as. оте. /, &c.), 7 emphasizes the condition as such: hence i ft if only, always supposing that.
Page 229 - prospective2'. 1 Monro (Homeric Grammar, 315) described this kind of optative as "a softened Future, expressing expectation, or mere admission of possibility (the English may or should)"; and he called it "quasi-Future". 2 For the history of this category of the subjunctive see "The Prospective Subjunctive" by the present writer (Classical Review, Vol.
Page 263 - AuX^eraiT, and expresses a wish : ' may they (after their wooing) have no other meeting, but sup now for the last time.' " I should prefer to say that we have two wishes fused by passion into one, the full expression would have been /?/ XXoo' о/мХт/о-снтес TThi9ls the only Instance of theaorlst l:i the Ill.il.
Page 7 - Greek has no Passive Endings distinct from those of the Active and Middle : it is desirable therefore to speak, not of Passive forms, but of the Passive meaning or use of a form.
Page 221 - KV is especially common after a Principal Clause of negative meaning (in which case the consequence is necessarily matter of mere supposition) : as — II.
Page 285 - We wish to contest this alleged difference between the Iliad and the Odyssey, and to defend the " Odyssean " books of the former. First, we would remark that the statement seems to be wanting in precision, as statements regarding hiatus unfortunately often are. There...
Page 267 - then indeed,' ' then rather,' ' even in that case.' Mr. Monro also calls attention to the difference of the accent, a point which Lange had emphasized before him. The enclisis of...
Page 267 - The general effect of these differences of usage between the two particles seems to be that Sv is used either in an adversative sense — with a second or opposed alternative — or when greater emphasis has to be expressed." KV is approximately ' then,' ' in that case,' ' — ' ' in one case,' ' in another case,' Kv ' then indeed,' ' then rather,'

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