Paths to Conflagration: Fifty Years of Diplomacy and Warfare in Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam, 1778-1828

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SEAP Publications, 1998 - History - 270 pages
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A reexamination of the historical relationship between Laos and Thailand, by two preeminent Lao historians who bring to light a wealth of new source material in their evaluation of the Laotian leader, Chao Anou, and his failed revolt against Siam. This book challenges conventional Thai interpretations of that event and of the political conflicts leading up to it.

 

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Contents

Foreword
9
The Fabric of History
17
The Hegemonic Crisis of the City of Angels
33
The Realignment of the Lao as Their Power Disintegrates
63
The Alliance and the Nature of Things
91
Britains Indochina Strategy
109
Meeting of Chao Anou and Crawfurd in Bangkok
111
Cleavages at the Bangkok Court
115
The Missing Links in the Lao Chain of Command
159
Map of Lan Sang in the Eighteenth Century
162
The Opening Phases of the 1827 Campaign
163
The Tyranny of Numbers
167
The Lao Armies Against All Odds
174
Khorat the Site of the Lao Diplomatic Offensive
179
The Military Phase of the 1827 Campaign
189
The Battlefield of PhetchabunLomsakLceiSiang Khan
194

The Siamese Arms Race
117
Lan Nas Advances Toward the British
120
Destabilization Scenarios of Siam
121
Great Britain Hold a Lao Card?
124
A Diplomatic Breakthrough Comes to Naught
129
Many Provocations and Anous Response
131
Breaking Spirits Crushing Bodies
138
Annexation of the Lao Miiang Through Tattooing
145
The Lao Demand the Return of Their Treasures
148
Lao Rulers Resist the Invasion and Commit to Freedom
152
Mapping out a Plan to Counter the Catastrophe on the Khorat Plateau
156
The Death of a Flamboyant Chief and the Martyrdom of a Hero
197
The Turning Point of the 1827 War
202
The Struggle to the Finish After Vientianes Fall and the Terreur Blanche
210
Omissions in Bodins War Memoirs and Questions about Tissas Loyalty
215
Vietnams Emperor Chooses Bangkok
223
Laos as a Buffer Zone
227
The Status of Laos Relative to Vietnam
230
Bangkoks Military Victory Hues Political Gains and Anous Last Stance
232
Conclusion
238
Bibliography
244
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