Negotiation Genius: How to Overcome Obstacles and Achieve Brilliant Results at the Bargaining Table and Beyond

Front Cover
Bantam Dell Publishing Group, 2008 - Business & Economics - 343 pages
12 Reviews
Deepak Malhotra is an associate professor at the Harvard Business School, where he teaches negotiation in the MBA program, the Advanced Management Program, and the Owner/President Management Program, in addition to providing negotiation consulting and training for businesses worldwide.

Max H. Bazerman is the Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and the author ofNegotiating RationallyandJudgment in Managerial Decision Making.


From the Hardcover edition.Becoming a Negotiation Genius

What is a negotiation genius? Let’s start with the simple observation that you often know a negotiation genius when you see one. You can see genius in the way a person thinks about, prepares for, and executes negotiation strategy. You can see genius in the way a person manages to completely turn around a seemingly hopeless negotiation situation. You can see genius in the way a person manages to negotiate successful deals–consistently–while still maintaining her integrity and strengthening her relationships and her reputation. And, in all likelihood, you know who the negotiation geniuses are in your organization. This book will share with you their secrets. Consider the following stories, in which negotiators faced great obstacles, only to overcome them to achieve remarkable levels of success. But we will not revealhowthey did it–yet. Instead, we will revisit these stories–and many others like them–in the chapters that follow, as we share with you the strategies and insights you need to negotiate like a genius in all aspects of life.

A Fight Over Exclusivity

Representatives of a Fortune 500 company had been negotiating the purchase of a new product ingredient from a small European supplier. The parties had agreed to a price of $18 per pound for a million pounds of product per year, but a conflict arose over exclusivity terms. The supplier would not agree to sell the ingredient exclusively to the U.S. firm, and the U.S. firm was unwilling to invest in producing a new product if competitors would have access to one of its key ingredients. This issue appeared to be a deal breaker. The U.S. negotiators were both frustrated and surprised by the small European firm’s reticence on the issue of exclusivity; they believed their offer was not only fair, but generous. Eventually, they decided to sweeten the deal with guaranteed minimum orders and a willingness to pay more per pound. They were shocked when the European firm still refused to provide exclusivity! As a last resort, the U.S. negotiators decided to call in their resident “negotiation genius,” Chris, who flew to Europe and quickly got up to speed. In a matter of minutes, Chris was able to structure a deal that both parties immediately accepted. He made no substantive concessions, nor did he threaten the small firm. How did Chris manage to save the day? We will revisit this story in Chapter 3.

A Diplomatic Impasse

In the fall of 2000, some members of the U.S. Senate began calling for a U.S. withdrawal from the United Nations. Meanwhile, at the United Nations, the United States was on the verge of losing its vote in the General Assembly. The conflict was over a debt of close to $1.5 billion, which the United States owed to the UN. The United States was unwilling to pay unless the UN agreed to a variety of reforms that it felt were long overdue. Most important, the United States wanted a reduction in its “assessments”–the percentage of the UN’s yearly regular budget that the United States was obligated to pay–from 25 percent to 22 percent. The problem was this: if the United States paid less, someone else would have to pay more. There were other serious complications as well. First, UN regulations stipulated that Richard Holbrooke, U.S. ambassador to t
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: Negotiation Genius: How to Overcome Obstacles and Achieve Brilliant Results at the Bargaining Table and Beyond

User Review  - Goodreads

I like the fact the authors deal with principles rather than magical recipes to achieve the desired results. They teach simple but profound concepts that can be leveraged in any relationship and not only in the bargaining table. Read full review

Review: Negotiation Genius: How to Overcome Obstacles and Achieve Brilliant Results at the Bargaining Table and Beyond

User Review  - Wade Brooks - Goodreads

A good book if you haven't been exposed to negotiation tactics before. A number of their theories are supported with studies and they even used an example from a favorite of mine, Moneyball. It is a ... Read full review

Contents

Becoming a Negotiation Genius
3
THE NEGOTIATORS TOOLKIT
8
Claiming Value in Negotiation
15
Creating Value in Negotiation
50
Investigative Negotiation
83
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF NEGOTIATION
103
When Rationality Fails Biases of the Mind
105
When Rationality Fails Biases of the Heart
125
Recognizing and Resolving Ethical Dilemmas
219
Negotiating from a Position of Weakness
236
When Negotiations Get Ugly Dealing with Irrationality Distrust Anger Threats and Ego
257
When Not to Negotiate
280
The Path to Genius
296
Glossary 305
304
Notes
311
Acknowledgments
321

Negotiating Rationally in an Irrational World
139
Strategies of Influence
159
Blind Spots in Negotiation
177
Confronting Lies and Deception
196
Index
325
About the Authors
341
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Deepak Malhotra is an associate professor at the Harvard Business School, where he teaches negotiation in the MBA program, the Advanced Management Program, and the Owner/President Management Program, in addition to providing negotiation consulting and training for businesses worldwide.

Max H. Bazerman is the Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and the author of Negotiating Rationally and Judgment in Managerial Decision Making.


From the Hardcover edition.

Bibliographic information