Philosophy of railroads, published by order of the directors of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa grand junction railway company

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Printed by J. Lovell, 1853 - Railroads - 47 pages
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Page 39 - But we find that we can move property upon railroads at the rate of 15 cents per ton per mile, or for one-tenth the cost upon the ordinary road. These works, therefore, extend the economic limit of the cost of transportation of the above articles to 3,300 and 1,650 miles respectively, At the limit of the economical movement of these articles upon the common highways, by use of the railroads wheat would be worth $44.
Page 5 - OLD Winter is once more upon us, and our inland seas are " dreary and inhospitable wastes" to the merchant and to the traveller; — our rivers are sealed fountains, — and an embargo which no human power can remove is laid on all our ports.
Page 39 - Upon the average of such ways, the cost of transportation is not far from 15 cents per ton per mile, which may be considered as a sufficiently correct estimate for the whole country. Estimating at the same time the value of wheat at $1.50 per bushel, and corn at 75 cents, and that 33 bushels of each are equal to a ton...
Page 39 - Estimating at the same time the value of wheat at $1.50 per bushel, and corn at 75 cents, and that 33 bushels of each are equal to a ton, the value of the former would be equal to its cost of transportation for 330 miles, and the latter, 165 miles. At these respective distances from market, neither of the above articles would have any commercial value, with only a common earth road as an avenue to market. But we find that we can move property upon railroads at the rate of 1.5 cent per ton per mile,...
Page 39 - These works therefore extend the economic limit of the cost of transportation of the above articles to 3,300 and 1,650 miles respectively. At the limit of the economical movement of these articles upon the common highway, by the use of railroads, wheat would be worth $44.50, and corn $22.27 per ton, which sums respectively would represent the actual increase of value created by the interposition of such a work.
Page 6 - Canada there is no escape: blockaded and imprisoned by Ice and Apathy, we have at least time for reflection.'75 But even if all importing, exporting, and wholesaling and much retailing occurred mainly in spring and fall, commerce was by no means as idle in the winter as Keefer claimed. Much produce (including timber) moved to waterways, and winter was also a season for settling accounts.
Page 38 - Lastly — we are placed beside a restless, early-rising, 'go-a-head' people - a people who are following the sun Westward, as if to obtain a greater portion of daylight: we cannot hold back — we must tighten our own traces or be overrun — we must use what we have or lose what we already possess — capital, commerce, friends and children will abandon us for better furnished lands unless we at once arouse from our lethargy; we can no longer afford to loiter away our winter months, or slumber...
Page 40 - There is no other country in the world where an equal amount of labor produces an equal bulk of freight for railroad transportation. One reason is, that the great mass of our products is of a coarse, bulky character, of very low comparative value, and consisting chiefly of the products of the soil and forest. We manufacture very few high-priced goods, labor being more profitably employed upon what are at present more appropriate objects of industry. The great bulk of the articles carried upon railroads...
Page 16 - ... longevity; ideas are exchanged by lightning — readers and their books travel together but little behind their thoughts - while actors, materials, scenes and scenery are shifted with the rapidity and variety of the kaleidoscope. The extraordinary expansion of the Railway System, within the last thirty years, is to be ascribed to the improved appreciation of the Value of Time; since it is now universally admitted, that distances are virtually shortened in the precise ratio in which the times...
Page 48 - States, 13,219 miles of completed railroad, 12,928 miles of railroad in various stages of progress, and about 7,000 miles in the hands of the engineers, which will be built within the next three or four years, — making a total of 33,155 miles of railroad which will soon traverse the country, and which, at an average cost of $30,000 (a well ascertained average) for each mile of road, including equipments...

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