Elections, Mass Politics and Social Change in Modern Germany: New Perspectives

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Cambridge University Press, 1992 - History - 430 pages
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This collection of essays presents the most recent work on Germany's stormy and problematic encounter with mass politics from the time of Bismarck to the Nazi era. The authors--sixteen scholars from the United States, Canada, Great Britain and Germany--consider this problem from novel and sometimes surprising viewpoints. The history of elections, narrowly conceived, is abandoned in favor of a broader inquiry into roots of German political loyalties and their relationship to the historic cleavages of class, gender, language, religion, generation and locality. The essays not only present archival findings, but they also pursue more theoretical or conjectural paradigms, and raise new questions. Collectively, the authors explore the twin problems of electoral politics and social dislocation with language that is intentionally familiar, inventive, and allusive all at once--in a sense reflecting the Germans' own unfinished search for political consensus and social stability.
  

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Contents

Political Mobilization and Collective Identities
1
Women in
7
National Issues
17
Antisocialism and Electoral Politics in Regional
49
The Liberal Power Monopoly in the Cities of Imperial
93
The Prospects
119
Women Gender and the Limits of Political History
149
Ideology
175
Politics
267
Weimar Populism and National Socialism in Local
287
Some
307
of Recent German History Stuart T Robson
331
Generational Conflict and the Problem of Political
347
The Social Bases of Political Cleavages in the Weimar
371
The Formation and Dissolution of a German National
399
Index
419

Germany Elizabeth Harvey
201
Democracy or Reaction? The Political Implications
247

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About the author (1992)

James Retallack is Professor of History and German Studies at the University of Toronto. He has held visiting professorships at the University of Gottingen and the Free University, Berlin, and has published widely on German history from the late eighteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries.

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