The Heart of the Puritan: Selections from Letters and Journals

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Elizabeth Deering Hanscom
Macmillan, 1917 - American letters - 281 pages
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Page 6 - Our fathers were Englishmen which came over this great ocean, and were ready to perish in this wilderness; but they cried unto the Lord, and He heard their voice and looked on their adversity,
Page 94 - Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth.
Page 274 - Being, in some way or other invisible, comes to her and fills her mind with exceeding sweet delight, and that she hardly cares for anything except to meditate on Him ; that she expects after a while to be received up where He is, to be raised up out of the world and caught up into heaven ; being assured that He loves her too well to let her remain at a distance from Him always.
Page 273 - God, so to speak, at the first appearance of a thunder-storm; and used to take the opportunity, at such times, to fix myself in order to view the clouds, and see the lightnings play, and hear the majestic and awful voice of God's thunder...
Page 6 - It is recorded in scripture as a mercie to ye apostle & his shipwraked company, y' the barbarians shewed them no smale kindnes in refreshing them, but these savage barbarians, when they mette with them (as after will appeare) were readier to fill their sids full of arrows then otherwise. And for ye season it was winter, and they that know ye winters of y...
Page 167 - I tho't was boil'd in her dye Kettle; the bread was Indian, and every thing on the Table service Agreeable to these. I, being hungry, gott a little down; but my stomach was soon cloy'd, and what cabbage I swallowed serv'd me for a Cudd the whole day after.
Page 272 - After this my sense of divine things gradually increased, and became more and more lively, and had more of that inward sweetness. The appearance of everything was altered: there seemed to be, as it were, a calm, sweet cast, or appearance of divine glory, in almost everything.
Page 223 - The serpent is the devil; the synod, the representative of the churches of Christ in New England. The devil had formerly and lately attempted their disturbance and dissolution ; but their faith in the seed of the woman overcame him and crushed his head.
Page 167 - ... lodg my tongue a hair's breadth more on one side of my mouth than tother, nor so much as think on...
Page 272 - And scarce any thing, among all the works of nature, was so sweet to me as thunder and lightning; formerly nothing had been so terrible to me. Before, I used to be uncommonly terrified with thunder, and to be struck with terror when I saw a thunder-storm rising; but now, on the contrary, it rejoiced me.

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