Diplomatic Realism: William R. Castle, Jr., and American Foreign Policy, 1919-1953

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University of Hawaii Press, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 251 pages
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This book describes Castle's intellectual preparation for foreign service and his life-long commitment to diplomatic realism in the making of foreign policy. Castle's application of diplomatic realism is examined in his impact on U.S.-Japan relations, the Manchurian incident, the London Naval Conference of 1930, the Republican Party's opposition to intervention in Asia and to Roosevelt's World War II foreign policy, and the reconstruction of Japan after 1945. Special attention is paid to the strengths and weaknesses of diplomatic realism as a foreign-policy position.
 

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Contents

A Moral Endowment for Public Service
1
The Corporate State in the 1920s
21
The London Naval Conference
37
The Hoover Moratorium
50
The Presidential Election of 1936
92
Opposition to Intervention in Asia 19391941
106
Opposition to World War II Foreign Policy
119
Diplomatic Realism
144
An Aged Realist Examines Cold War Assumptions
158
Appendix Selected Radio Speeches to Japan
167
Notes
195
Bibliography
231
Index
245
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Alfred L. Castle, like his great-uncle, Henry Northrup Castle, is a graduate of Punahou School in Honolulu and Colorado State University (BA and MA) and the author of numerous journal articles, book reviews, and feature articles, as well as the author of a book on the history of philanthropy. Castle has taught at universities in New Mexico, Hawaii, and California. He is the grandnephew of George Herbert Mead and Helen Castle Mead and currently serves as executive director of the Samuel N. and Mary Castle Foundation, one of America's oldest family foundations. His most recent book is entitled "Diplomatic Realism: W. R. Castle, Jr., and American Foreign Policy, 1919-1953".

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