The Jewish war: a new tr., by R. Traill, ed. with notes by I. Taylor

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Great book!! Josephus is a controversial character, but an invaluable one none-the-less...it provides some powerful insight into the ushering in of the Middle Ages.

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Page 197 - A voice from the east, a voice from the west, a voice from the four winds, a voice against Jerusalem and the holy house, a voice against the bridegrooms and the brides, and a voice against this whole people.
Page 46 - Nature, doing violence to herself in bringing together plants of discordant habits, and an admirable rivalry of the seasons, each, as it were, asserting her right to the soil ; for it not only possesses the extraordinary virtue of nourishing fruits of opposite climes, but also maintains a continual supply of them. Thus it produces those most royal of all, the grape and the fig, during ten months, without intermission, while the other varieties ripen the year round.
Page lxiv - ... rivalry of the seasons, each, as it were, asserting her right to the soil. For it not only possesses the extraordinary virtue of nourishing fruits of opposite climes, but also maintains a continual supply of them. Thus, it produces those most royal of all, the grape and the fig, during ten months without intermission, while the other varieties ripen the year round...
Page 129 - The Temple, as I have said, was seated on a strong hill. Originally, the level space on its summit scarcely sufficed for the sanctuary and the altar, the ground about being abrupt and steep ; but King Solomon, who built the sanctuary, having completely Walled up the eastern side, a colonnade was built upon the embankment ; on the other side the sanctuary remained exposed. In process of time, however, as people were constantly adding to the embankment, the hill became level and broader.
Page 241 - ... now the time has come that bids us prove our determination by our deeds. At such a time we must not disgrace ourselves: hitherto we have never submitted to slavery, even when it brought no danger with it: we must not choose slavery now, and with it penalties that will mean the end of everything if we fall alive into the hands of the Romans. For we were the first of all to revolt, and shall be the last to break off the struggle. And I think it is God who has given us this privilege that we can...
Page 228 - ... likewise made of gold, but constructed on a different pattern from those which we use in ordinary life. Affixed to a pedestal was a central shaft, from which there extended slender branches, arranged trident-fashion, a wrought lamp being attached to the extremity of each branch ; of these there were seven, indicating the honour paid to that number among the Jews. After these, and last of all the spoils, was carried a copy of the Jewish Law.
Page cxci - March and April April and May May and June June and July July and August August and September September and October October and November November and December December and January January and February February and March intercalated.
Page 115 - Josephus says that in the winter of 69-70, John's party burned the buildings stocked with provisions, and Simon did the same, "as though they were purposely serving the Romans by destroying what the city had provided against a siege... The city was converted into a desolate no man's land...
Page cxii - ... composed of white stone ;' but on breaking the stone, it appeared that it was naturally whitish, and had been burnt brown by the sun. In the existing foundations we could trace only the general outlines of the structures which Josephus describes. The peculiar form of some, composed of long parallel rooms, indicated that they had been store-houses or barracks, rather than private dwellings. The architecture, both of the wall and of the buildings, was of one kind, consisting of rough stones quarried...
Page lxxiii - The first part of the road led through a fine plain, watered by a pretty, winding rivulet, with numerous tributary streams, and many old ruined mills ; we then began to ascend over very rugged and rocky ground, quite void of vegetation ; in some places there were traces of an ancient paved way, probably the Roman road leading from Damascus to...

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