Ghost Eater: A Novel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan, Sep 25, 2003 - Fiction - 320 pages
3 Reviews
A riveting thriller, Ghost Eater marks the introduction of an intense new voice in
seafaring adventure.

Moored in a wintry Asian harbor at the turn of the twentieth century, Captain Ulysses Vanders experiences a revelation. A ferryman brings a mysterious gift--a wine at once rare and familiar that brings the sailor back to a moment in Sumatra thirty years before. "I closed my eyes, remembering where I had last tasted this liquor, remembering back across the years, remembering how steady the hand had been that held out the cup to me, and how desperate the circumstances. With a stab, her face rose before me--beautiful, tantalizing, terrible to behold."

This haunting memory leads the sailor back to his first command and a desperate river journey to rescue missionaries along a remote jungle river. Captain of an aging steamboat, Vanders soon finds himself burdened with a set of unexpected, mysterious passengers, each traveling to the mission outpost known as "Light of the World" for reasons of his or her own. The island world Vanders discovers is a ghostly place, darkly lit with the flames of social upheaval, a world of superstition and strife, as age-old ways of life are swept away in the murderous rampage of a tribe gone mad. At the edge of civilization, the young American captain learns not only the challenge of command but the courage to confront his own illusions, beautiful and terrible to behold.

  

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Ghost eater

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

If Joseph Conrad and H. Rider Haggard were to collaborate on a work of fiction, the result would come very close to Ghost Eater. Set in 19th-century Sumatra, this debut novel features an exotic ... Read full review

Review: Ghost Eater: A Novel

User Review  - Sherri Dub - Goodreads

I wanted to like the journey of this book's plot and the Sea captain. I didn't. I felt cheated. There were moments when the author gave a brilliant show of his use of prose, then he'd fall flat. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter One
1
Chapter Two
9
Chapter Three
30
Chapter Four
38
Chapter Five
61
Chapter Six
68
Chapter Seven
87
Chapter Eight
102
Chapter Eighteen
194
Chapter Nineteen
203
Chapter Twenty
214
Chapter TwentyOne
223
Chapter TwentyTwo
229
Chapter TwentyThree
238
Chapter TwentyFour
255
Chapter TwentyFive
266

Chapter Nine
108
Chapter Ten
118
Chapter Eleven
130
Chapter Twelve
140
Chapter Thirteen
148
Chapter Fourteen
155
Chapter Fifteen
163
Chapter Sixteen
168
Chapter Seventeen
180
Chapter TwentySix
273
Chapter TwentySeven
282
Chapter TwentyEight
289
Chapter TwentyNine
307
Chapter Thirty
316
Chapter ThirtyOne
329
Chapter ThirtyTwo
337
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Frederick Highland has been, according the seasons and the tides, a tropical agriculturalist, merchant seaman, and university lecturer. He has traveled widely, lived in the Far East, the Middle East, and Europe and currently writes in Washington state.

Bibliographic information