Aboriginal America

Front Cover
Sheldon & Company, 1860 - Indians of North America
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Contents

I
15
II
47
III
75
IV
97
V
129
VI
155
VII
183
VIII
218
IX
252
X
272
Copyright

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Page 286 - When white man's child die, Indian man be sorry — he help bury him. When my child die, no one speak to me — 1 make his grave alone. I can no live here.
Page 286 - Though not ill treated, yet the common prejudice Against Indians prevented any sympathy with him. This was shown at the death of his only child, when none of the people came near him. Shortly afterwards, he went to some of the inhabitants, and said to them, ' When white man's child die, Indian man be sorry — he help bury him.
Page v - The several volumes will be illustrated with all necessary maps and with numerous engravings, and the work is intended to comprise, in a distinct and connected narrative, all that it is essential for the general reader to understand in respect to the subject of it, while for those who have time for more extended studies, it...
Page 104 - There is one thing very curious about this class of animals that get their living in a great measure under water, and are consequently obliged to be often submerged, even in the coldest winter weather, and that is, that their fur becomes very little wet by such immersion. A dog, after plunging into a river, comes out wet to the skin, but the fur of a beaver or a mink, on account probably of some oleaginous substance with which it is dressed, does not allow the water to penetrate, so that, after swimming...
Page 185 - Indians could shoot an arrow swifter than a bullet could be thrown from a gun, and one of them has been known to pass entirely through the body of a buffalo — at least so it is stated on what seems to be very good authority.
Page 276 - ... rank. The Caucasian race ... is endowed with constitutions adapting them to gain their livelihood by agriculture, commerce, and the manufacturing arts, a mode of life by which the same territory is capable of supporting many hundred millions — we know not how many. Under these circumstances it was inevitable, and as much in fulfillment of the designs of divine Providence, that the old races should be supplanted by the new, as that the horse and the cow should displace the alligator and the...
Page 275 - ... of races formed with constitutions, both physical and mental, adapting them to obtain their livelihood by fishing and the chase — • modes of life by means of which North America might sustain perhaps twenty or thirty millions of inhabitants. The Caucasian race, which was introduced from Europe, is endowed with constitutions adapting them to gain their livelihood by agriculture, commerce, and the manufacturing arts, a mode of life by which the same territory is capable of supporting many hundred...
Page 276 - ... it was as inevitable, and as much in fulfillment of the designs of divine Providence, that the old races should be supplanted by the new, as that the horse and the cow should displace the alligator and the elk, and brakes and bulrushes yield their native grounds to corn. And such has been the fact. It has been estimated that at the time America was discovered the number of Indians dwelling within the limits of the United States was about sixteen millions. Of the descendants of these sixteen millions...

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