Journal of the Co. Kildare Archaeological Society and Surrounding Districts, Volume 2

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Page 384 - Here Lies the Body of Mr XEHEMIAH ROY CE Who Departed This Life Feb (?)— AD 1791 In the both Year of His Age Behold and see, as you pass by As you are now, so once was I. As I am now so you must be. Prepare for death and follow me.
Page 201 - Vanessa, not in years a score, dreams of a gown of forty-four ; imaginary charms can find in eyes with reading almost blind : Cadenus now no more appears declin'd in health, advanc'd in years. She fancies music in his tongue; no farther looks, but thinks him young.
Page 202 - His conduct might have made him styled A father, and the nymph his child. That innocent delight he took To see the virgin mind her book, Was but the master's secret joy In school to hear the finest boy.
Page 201 - Bartholomew Vanhomrigh, a Dutch merchant, who had been commissary of stores for King William during the Irish civil wars, and afterwards muster-master-general, and commissioner of the revenue.
Page 135 - ... he was thoroughly acquainted), parching in the heat of his choler, and said : ' So it is, and if it like your good lordship, one of your horssemen promised me a choise horsse if I snip one hair from your beard.'
Page 54 - so nimble and swift of foot, that, like unto stags, they ran over mountains and valleys," hovered around with barbarous howls, in every direction, cutting off the stragglers and foragers, and hurling their darts or short javelins with a degree of force that no coat of arms could withstand. Though...
Page 51 - Irish thereby got the opportunitie to recover now this, and then that part of the land ; whereby, and through the degenerating of a great many from time to time, who joining themselves with the Irish, took upon them their wild fashions and their language, the English in length of time came to be so much weakened, that at last nothing remained to them of the whole Kingdome, worth the speaking of...
Page 246 - Nor is the miracle that occurred in repairing the church, to be passed over in silence, in which repose the bodies of both, that is Bishop Conlaeth and this holy Virgin St. Bridget, on the right and the left of the decorated altar, deposited in monuments adorned with various embellishments of gold and silver and gems and precious stones, with crowns of gold and silver depending from above.
Page 52 - An old distinction there is of Ireland into Irish and English Pales, for when the Irish had raised continual tumults against the English planted here with the conquest, at last they coursed them into a narrow circuit of certain shires in Leinster, which the English did choose as the fattest soil, most defensible, their proper right, and most open to receive help from England...
Page 135 - Irish hobbie, on condition that he would plucke an haire from the Earle his beard. Boice taking the proffer at rebound, stept to the Earle (with whose good nature he was...

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