Culture Wars in British Literature: Multiculturalism and National Identity

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McFarland, Aug 31, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 232 pages
The past century’s culture wars that Britain has been consumed by, but that few North Americans seem aware of, have resulted in revised notions of Britishness and British literature. Yet literary anthologies remain anchored to an archaic Anglo-English interpretation of British literature. Conflicts have been played out over specific national vs. British identity (some residents prefer to describe themselves as being from Scotland, England, Wales, or Northern Ireland instead of Britain), in debates over immigration, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and in arguments over British literature. These debates are strikingly detailed in such chapters as: “The Difficulty Defining ‘Black British’,” “British Jewish Writers” and “Xenophobia and the Booker Prize.” Connections are also drawn between civil rights movements in the U.S. and UK. This generalist cultural study is a lively read and a fascinating glimpse into Britain’s changing identity as reflected in 20th and 21st century British literature.
 

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Contents

Foreword by Thomas C Caramagno
1
Preface
5
Mind the Gap
11
Literary Reactions to Britains Changed Empire
23
Chapter Two The Difficulty Defining British Literature
54
Chapter Three The Difficulty Defining Black British
82
Class Issues in Contemporary British Literature
113
Chapter Five British Jewish Writers
128
Chapter Six Xenophobia and the Booker Prize
143
Chapter Seven Britains New Multicultural Identity
159
Man Booker Prize Winners
179
International Man Booker Prize Winners
189
Orange Prize Winners
190
Works Cited
195
Index
205
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Tracy J. Prince is a Scholar-in-Residence at Portland State University’s Portland Center for Public Humanities in Oregon. She has spent her career teaching and writing about race, gender, and social equity issues and has taught in or spent extensive research time in Turkey, Australia, England, Canada, and throughout the United States.

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