A book of the United States: exhibiting its geography, divisions, Constitution and government: and presenting a view of the republic generally, and of the individual states; together with a condensed history of the land. The biography of the leading men; a description of the principal cities and towns, with statistical tables

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Grenville Mellen
G.C. Smith, 1839 - United States - 824 pages
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Page 426 - The United States shall guarantee to every state in the union, a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion : and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.
Page 697 - That it be recommended to the provincial convention of New Hampshire to call a full and free representation of the people, and that the representatives, if they think it necessary, establish such a form of government as, in their judgment, will best produce the happiness of the people, and most effectually secure peace and good order in the province, during the continuance of the present dispute between Great Britain and the colonies.
Page 665 - Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the First his Cromwell — and George the Third — [" Treason " cried the Speaker ; " treason ! treason ! " echoed from every part of the house.
Page 796 - It is moreover agreed that hereafter there shall not be formed by the citizens of the United States, or under the authority of the said States, any establishment upon the Northwest Coast of America, nor in any of the islands adjacent to the north of...
Page 390 - The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing senators.
Page 724 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defence, the security of their Liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon, them or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 396 - The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall be the Vice-President. if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of...
Page 567 - Morris ; and in 1787, was a member of the convention which framed the constitution of the United States. In...
Page 796 - The real question, as seen in the States afflicted with this unfortunate population, is, are our slaves to be presented with freedom and a dagger? For if Congress has the power to regulate the conditions of the inhabitants of the States, within the States, it will be but another exercise of that power, to declare that all shall be free.
Page 202 - ... for half an hour, or an hour, at a time. His expanded wings and tail, glistening with white, and the buoyant gaiety of his action, arresting the eye, as his song most irresistibly does the ear, he sweeps round with enthusiastic...

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