A Grammar of Saramaccan Creole

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Walter de Gruyter, Oct 30, 2012 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 257 pages
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Saramaccan has been central to various debates regarding the origin and nature of creole languages. Being the most removed of all English-based creoles from European language structure in terms of phonology, morphology and syntax, it has been seen as one of the most extreme instantiations of the creolization process. This is the first full-length description of Saramaccan. The grammar documents, in particular, a valence-sensitive system of indicating movement and direction via serial verb constructions, hitherto overlooked amidst the generalized phenomenon of serialization itself.

 

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Contents

1 Segmental phonology
1
2 Prosodic phonology
30
3 Morphology and morphophonemics
63
4 The noun phrase
76
5 Personal pronouns
94
6 Adjectives
100
Negators tense aspect and modals
113
8 Verb serialization
137
13 Position direction and time
186
14 Adverbial modification
196
15 Information structure
205
16 Numerals and other time expressions
221
17 Lexical variation
224
Word list
226
Folktale transcription
228
Conversational passage
232

9 Coordination and subordination
150
10 Passive and imperative
164
11 Questions
173
12 Nonverbal predication and fteverbs
178

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About the author (2012)

John H. McWhorter, Columbia University, New York, USA; Jeff Good, University at Buffalo, New York, USA.

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