The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

Front Cover
Berghahn Books, 2004 - Social Science - 374 pages

CHOICE OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR 2005

Despite the growth of interest in the history of anthropology as a over the last two decades, surprisingly little has been published in English on the development of anthropology in East and Southeast Asia and its relationship to the rest of the academic "world-system." The anthropological experience in this region has been varied. Japanese anthropology developed early, and ranks second only to that of the United States in terms of size. Anthropology in China has finally recovered from the experience of invasion, war, and revolution, and now flourishes both on the mainland and in Taiwan. Scholars in Korea, Malaysia, and the Philippines have also attempted to break with the legacy of colonialism and develop research relevant to their own national needs.

This book includes accounts of these developments by some of the most distinguished scholars in the region. Also discussed are issues of language, authorship, and audience; and the effects these have on writing by anthropologists, whether "native" or "foreign." The book will be invaluable to anyone with an interest in the anthropology of East and Southeast Asia or the development of anthropology as a global discipline.

 

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Contents

Japan and Asia in
35
On the Tension Between Japanese and American
114
Japanese Anthropology and Depictions of the Ainu
136
Two Moments in the History
152
Chinese National Dance and the Discourse of Nativization
198
The Making and Indigenization of Anthropology in Korea
253
Anthropology Identity and Nation Formation in Malaysia
286
Responses Challenges and Experiences
335
Index
359
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About the author (2004)

Shinji Yamashita is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at The University of Tokyo.

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