Brain-Robbers: How Alcohol, Cocaine, Nicotine, and Opiates Have Changed Human History

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ABC-CLIO, Mar 28, 2014 - Health & Fitness - 349 pages
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Alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, and opiates have spurred some of the greatest human pleasure and pain across time. Providing information that ranges as widely as from ancient Egypt to modern times, this book comprehensively addresses the good, the bad, and the very ugliest aspects of these substances, examining their history, their effects on the brain and body, and on civilization itself. Frances R. Frankenburg, MD, employs accessible, everyday language to explain the neurology of addiction and describe how these "brain-robbing" substances work to hijack the brain's pleasure systems to create powerful addictions. The author also provides perspective into the intertwined, inescapable, and often uneasy relationship between these substances and human culture, economics, and politics—for example, how individuals become physically or psychologically addicted to alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, and opiates, while governments become financially "addicted" to the revenue, such as taxes, that can be collected from the sale and use of these substances.

 

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Contents

1 Alcohol
1
2 Why We Need Water
58
3 Fermentation
63
4 Distillation
68
The Scourge of Intemperance
70
6 Patent Medicines Lydia Pinkham and the Great American Fraud
74
Hatchetation against Saloonacy
84
8 Cocaine
91
The Discovery
166
14 Women and Cigarettes
174
15 Opiates
180
16 Discovery of the Opiate Receptor
209
The Role of Cocaine and Opiates
215
18 The Gladstones and Opium
227
19 Opium Smoking the Opium Wars and Emigration from China
233
20 The Brain
255

9 Sniffing Cocaine Heroin and Tobacco
114
10 William Stewart Halsted
118
11 Sigmund Freud and Cocaine
124
12 Nicotine
132
21 Addiction
286
Glossary
317
Index
331
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About the author (2014)

Frances R. Frankenburg, MD, is professor of psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine and chief of inpatient psychiatry at the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital in Bedford, MA.

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