History of India

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Brown, 1879 - India - 326 pages
 

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Page 283 - When, by the blessing of Providence, internal tranquillity shall be restored, it is our earnest desire to stimulate the peaceful industry of India, to promote works of public utility and improvement, and to administer the government for the benefit of all our subjects resident therein. In their prosperity will be our strength, in their contentment our security, and in their gratitude our best reward.
Page 165 - The cup is now full to the brim, and cannot hold another drop. If anything can be done, do it or else answer me plainly at once : hereafter there will be no time for writing nor speaking.
Page 68 - Vishnu-Sarma, who was present, offered to relieve the king of his anxiety by taking the princes to his house and instructing them perfectly. He then composed for their benefit the five tantras, viz. Mitrabheda, or 'dissension of friends'; Mitraprapti, or ' acquisition of friends'; Kakolukiya (the Crow and the Owl), or ' inveterate enmity'; Sabda-nashta, or ' loss of advantage '; Asamprekshyakaritwa, or ' inconsiderateness.' Four other works of a somewhat similar character are also celebrated. The...
Page 207 - ... overwhelming forces sent against him from Chanda Saheb's army that was besieging Trichinapalli, 1751. With his little band of heroes reduced to 320 men and four officers, he made good his position for seven weeks against 10,000 men headed by Raja Saheb, the son of Chanda Saheb. The people, seeing Clive and his men march steadily in a storm of thunder and lightning, said they were fireproof, and fled before him. The hero contemptuously refused Raja Saheb's bribes, and laughed at his threats. When...
Page 168 - She ruled, while ho was commander-in-chief. She was devout, merciful, and laborious, to an extraordinary degree ; and raised Indor from a village to a wealthy city. She was well educated, and possessed of a remarkably acute mind. She became a widow when she was twenty years old, and her son died a raving maniac, soon after. These things affected her whole life. In one thing she far excelled even the renowned English Queen Elizabeth : she was insensible to flattery. While living, she was ' one of...
Page 123 - Delhi ; but she, looking upon the emperor as the murderer of her husband, rejected his overtures with disdain. After a length of time, however, a reconciliation took place, and Nur Jahan became Empress of India. Her name was put on the coinage with the Emperor's. Her influence was unbounded. Her father was made prime minister; and her brother, Asaf Khan, was given a very high appointment. They used their power well ; and though Jahangir still indulged in nightly drunken debauches, the affairs of...
Page 251 - AB 1814. Generals Ochterlony and Gillespie were in command of the British troops ; but the latter was killed in a gallant but unsuccessful attempt to take the fortress of Kalunga, and the army met with several reverses. Amir Singh was the general of the Ghurkas. General Ochterlony at length succeeded in driving him from the heights of Ramgarh, which were exceedingly strong ; the Raja of Bilaspur was detached from the Nepal cause, and the province of Kumaon subdued. At last Amir Singh was shut up...
Page 100 - Abrantes, and at an early period distinguished himself in the wars with the Moors, but especially at the conquest of Granada, in 1492. In 1505, his sovereign...
Page 247 - Directors assured him, by a unanimous resolution, " that in their judgment he had been animated throughout his administration by an ardent zeal to promote the well-being of India, and to uphold the interest and honour of the British Empire...
Page 117 - The city of Ahmadnagar was then in the hands of the celebrated Chand Bibi, the aunt of the infant Sultan, Bahadur Nizam Shah. She made peace with her fatherin-law the King of Bijapur, conciliated the Abyssinian nobles, and defended the city with astonishing skill and bravery against Prince Murad, who was now pressing the siege. A breach was made in the wall, and the defenders were on the point of giving up the city, when the Sultana appeared in full armour, veiled, with a drawn sword in her hand...

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