Musical Record and Review, Issues 468-485

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Dexter Smith, Lorin Fuller Deland, Thomas Tapper, Philip Hale
O.Ditson & Company, 1901 - Music
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Page 37 - that The year's at the spring; And day's at the morn; Morning's at seven; The hill-side's dew-pearled; The lark's on the wing; The snail's on the thorn; God's in His heaven — All's right with the world. Now it
Page 3 - All music is what awakes from you, when you are reminded by the instruments. It is not the violins and the comets — it is not the oboe nor the beating drums, nor the notes of the baritone singer singing his sweet romanza — nor those of the
Page 17 - All music is what awakes from you, when you are reminded by the instruments. It is not the violins and the comets—it is not the oboe nor the beating drums, nor the notes of the baritone singer singing his sweet romanza — nor those of the men's chorus. nor those of the women's chorus, It is nearer and farther than they.
Page 5 - All music is what awakes from you, when you are reminded by the instruments. It is not the violins and the comets—it is not the oboe nor the beating drums, nor the notes of the baritone singer singing his sweet romanza — nor those of the men's chorus, nor those of the women's chorus, It is nearer and farther than they.
Page 7 - from you, when you are reminded by the instruments. It is not the violins and the comets — it is not the oboe nor the beating drums, nor the notes of the baritone singer singing his sweet romanza — nor those of the men's chorus, nor those of the women's chorus, It is nearer and
Page 3 - Blessed is he who has found his work: let him ask no other blessedness. He has a work, a life-purpose: he has found it and will follow it
Page 19 - Above all, those insufferable concertos and pieces of music, as they are called, do plague and embitter my apprehension. Words are something ; but to be exposed to an endless battery of mere sounds ; to be long a-dying ; to lie stretched upon a rack of roses ; to keep up languor by
Page 19 - effort ; to pile honey upon sugar and sugar upon honey to an interminable tedious sweetness ; to fill up sound with feeling, and strain ideas to keep pace with it ; to gaze on empty frames, and to be forced to make the pictures for yourself ; to read a book all
Page 18 - the loyalty of Elia never been impeached. I am not without suspicion that I have an undeveloped faculty of music within me ; for, thrumming in my wild way on my friend A's piano the other morning, while he was engaged in an adjoining parlor, on his return he was pleased to say
Page 25 - So, an octave struck the answer, oh, they praised you, I dare say! “Brave Galuppi? that was music! Good alike at grave and gay! I can always leave off talking when I hear a master play.

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