Shiva's Fire

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Nov 1, 2001 - Juvenile Fiction - 276 pages
61 Reviews
In India, Parvati, a talented dancer with supernatural powers, is invited to Madras to study with a great master and sacrifices friends and family for her art. By the Newbery Honor-winning author of Shabanu. Reprint.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
20
4 stars
15
3 stars
22
2 stars
4
1 star
0

Review: Shiva's Fire

User Review  - Goodreads

This wasn't what I was hoping. The main character is a sweet perfect Mary Sue type, which I could deal with if the plot didn't have so many dangling threads. Maybe I'm looking for more complexity than ... Read full review

Review: Shiva's Fire

User Review  - Goodreads

I thought that the book was very good, it is about a girl who deals with great catastrophes the day she is born. The death of her father and a monsoon that Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
15
Section 3
23
Section 4
39
Section 5
52
Section 6
92
Section 7
104
Section 8
122
Section 11
166
Section 12
181
Section 13
197
Section 14
208
Section 15
220
Section 16
228
Section 17
241
Section 18
248

Section 9
141
Section 10
156
Section 19
259
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 247 - He held her face between his hands and looked into her eyes. "Tamara, talk. Talk. You must, Tamara. Try. You must. The war is over. You can hear now. You can talk again.
Page 172 - Flames danced on more than a dozen wicks set in the small vessels of a many-tiered bronze lamp. Birds flitted in and perched atop the rolled shades. Parvati kicked off her sandals and set them on the step before entering and bowing to the Guru. The polished cement floor felt warm under her bare feet.
Page 92 - ... the theatre?' She walked through the foyer of the National Theatre hanging on Ivo Karajich's arm. Never forget that you are a king's daughter! Grandfather would have said. How silly! As if it were possible to forget what she always carried with her, and as if she needed to remind herself of what was as much a part of her as the blood in her veins ! As she mounted the marble staircase, erect and serious, with her dress rustling — a...
Page 249 - Parvati stammered, realizing as the words came out of her mouth that it was an uncomfortably warm night.

About the author (2001)

Suzanne Fisher Staples is the author of Shabanu, winner of a 1990 Newbery Honor and Haveli. Both were ALA Notable Books and ALA Best Books for Young Adults. She has been a UPI foreign correspondent posted in Pakistan, Hong Kong, Afghanistan, and India, and now lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Bibliographic information