A Biographical History of England: from Egbert the Great to the Revolution: Consisting of Characters Disposed in Different Classes, and Adapted to a Methodical Catalogue of Engraved British Heads, Volume 2

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William Baynes and Son ; and sold, 1824 - Great Britain
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Page 181 - Whose adorning let it not be that outWard adorning of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel ; but let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.
Page 119 - When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing ; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good; myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things...
Page 113 - Even such is man, whose thread is spun, Drawn out, and cut, and so is done. The rose withers, the blossom blasteth, The flower fades, the morning hasteth, The sun sets, the shadow flies, The gourd consumes, and man — he dies!
Page 181 - Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought, That one might almost say her body thought.
Page 156 - Monday came, all was well. Tuesday came, he not sick. Wednesday came, and still he was well ; with which his impertinent wife did much twit him in the teeth. Thursday came, and dinner was ended, he very well : he went down to the water-side and took a pair of oars to go to some buildings he was in hand with in Puddle Dock. Being in the middle of the Thames, he presently fell down, only saying, ' An impost, an impost,
Page 23 - For we have heard him say, that this Jesus of Nazareth shall destroy this place, and shall change the customs which Moses delivered us. And all that sat in the council, looking stedfastly on him, saw his face as it had been the face of an angel.
Page 52 - The Man in the Moon, or a Discourse of a Voyage thither, by Domingo Gonsales, l638,"Svo.
Page 120 - This figure that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut, Wherein the graver had a strife With nature, to out-do the life. O, could he but have drawn his wit As well in brass as he hath hit His face — the print would then surpass All that was ever writ in brass. But since he cannot, Reader, look Not on his picture, but his book.
Page 164 - Bull's music was good ; and he remarks, in reference to some of them, " that they may be heard by a lover of music, with as little emotion as the clapper of a mill, or the rumbling of a post-chaise.
Page 314 - It is hard to say whether his person, his understanding, or his courage, was the most extraordinary ; as the fair, the learned, and the brave, held him in equal admiration. But the same man was wise, and capricious ; redressed wrongs, and quarrelled for punctilios; hated bigotry in religion, and was himself a bigot to philosophy.

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