Introduction to geochemistry

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McGraw-Hill, 1995 - Science - 647 pages
Reflecting rapid changes in our knowledge of the earth's chemistry, this revision is more quantitative, gives more attention to environmental issues, and places greater emphasis on the application of geochemistry to geological problems than its predecessor. Using examples from actual field and laboratory studies, the authors give students a feeling for the application of geochemistry for many kinds of earth-science inquiry.

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Contents

Preface
xiii
Historical Geochemisny
liii
Preface xiii
lv
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Konrad B. Krauskopf was born and raised in Madison, Wisconsin and earned a B.S. in chemistry from University of Wisconsin in 1931. He then earned a Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of California in Berkeley. When the Great Depression made jobs in chemistry scarce, Professor Krauskopf decided to study geology, which had long fascinated him. Through additional graduate work at Stanford University, he earned a second Ph.D. and eventually a position on the Stanford faculty. He remained at Stanford until his retirement in 1976. During his tenure, Professor Krauskopf also worked at various times with the U.S. Geological Survey, served with the U.S. army in occupied Japan, and traveled to Norway, France, and Germany on sabbatical leaves. His research interests included field work on granites and metamorphic rocks and laboratory study on applications of chemistry to geologic problems, especially the formation of ore deposits. In recent years, Professor Krauskopf had spent time working with various government agencies on the problem of radioactive waste disposal.

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