Three voyages in the Black Sea to the coast of Circassia: including descriptions of the ports, and the importance of their trade: with sketches of the manners, customs, religion ...

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J. Murray, 1837 - History - 303 pages
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Page 297 - ... escape. We have amongst us men who have been favoured and flattered and honoured by the Emperor, and who have preferred to that favour the dangers of their country. We have amongst us thousands of Russians, who prefer our barbarism to the civilization of their country. Russia has built forts on points of our territory, but they dare not venture beyond the reach of their guns — 50,000 Russians have lately made an inroad, and they have been beaten. It is by arms, not by words, that a country...
Page 294 - Rayas and yourselves. Our mountains have been the ramparts of Persia and Turkey, they will become, unless supported, the gate to both — they are now the only shelter for both. They are the doors of the house, by closing which alone the hearth can be defended. But, moreover, our blood, Circassian blood, fills the veins of the Sultan. His mother, his harem, is Circassian. His slaves are Circassians. His ministers and his generals are Circassian. He is the chief of our faith, and also of our race...
Page 294 - They have also applied to Persia with no better success, and finally to Mehemet Ali, who, although appreciating their devotion, was too far off then to support them. In all these cases the deputies of Circassia had been instructed to tell to those who, being at a distance, did not know, how intolerable was the oppression of Russia, how hostile she was to the customs, the faith and happiness of all men (or why should the Circassians have fought so long against her), how treacherous were her generals,...
Page 295 - It is, therefore, with the profoundest humiliation that we have learnt that our country is marked, on all the maps printed in Europe, as a portion of Russia; that treaties, of which we know nothing, should have been signed between Russia and Turkey, pretending to hand over to the Russians these warriors that make Russia tremble, and these mountains where her footsteps have never come ; that Russia tells in the West that the Circassians are her slaves, or wild bandits and savages, whom no kindness...
Page 295 - Russia he cannot ac cept it, for Circassia is at war. Our allegiance is a free offering ; he cannot sell it, because he has not bought it. " Let not a great nation, like England, to whom our eyes are turned, and our hands are raised, think of us at all if it be to do us injustice. Let her not open her ear to the wiles of the Russian, while she closes it to the prayer of the Circassian. Let her judge by facts between the people that is called savage and barbarous, and its calumniator. " We are Four...
Page 31 - He led the goddess to the sovereign seat, Her feet supported with a stool of state ; A purple carpet spread the pavement wide ; Then drew his seat, familiar, to her side : Far from the suitor-train, a brutal crowd, With insolence and wine elate and loud ; Where the free guest, unnoted, might relate...
Page 88 - Your widow'd hours, apart, with female toil And various labours of the loom beguile ; There rule, from palace-cares remote and free ; That care to man belongs, and most to me.
Page 295 - Treaties of which we know nothing should be signed between Russia and Turkey, pretending to hand over to the Russians these Warriors that make Russia tremble, and these Mountains where her Footsteps have never come — that Russia tells in the West that the Circassians are her Slaves, or wild Bandits and Savages whom no Kindness can soften and no Laws can restrain. Who has the Power to...
Page 113 - And to their several domes to rest resort. A towering structure to the palace join'd; To this his steps the thoughtful prince inclined: In his pavilion there, to sleep repairs; The lighted torch, the sage Euryclea bears (Daughter of Ops, the just Pisenor's son, For twenty beeves by great Laertes won...
Page 295 - ... that England and France are the first among the nations of the globe, and were great and powerful when the Russians came in little boats, and got from us permission to catch fish in the sea of Azof. ''We thought that England and France would take no interest in a simple and poor people like us ; but we did not doubt that such wise nations knew that we were not Russians, and though we know little, and have no artillery, generals, discipline, ships, or riches — that we are an honest people, and...

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