Little Folks Astray

Front Cover
Lee & Shepard, 1894 - Authors, American - 203 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - Not cruel a bit; good enough forme," cried Horace, with a generous outburst. "You're just the jolliest woman, auntie — the jolliest woman ! There you are ; you look so little and sweet ! But if folks think they're going to get ahead of you, why, just let 'em try it, say I !" DEAR READERS : Horace was scarcely more astonished, when his pocket was picked, than I am this minute, to find myself at the end of my book ! I had very much more to tell ; but now it must wait till another time. Meanwhile...
Page 107 - I don't doss to give folks my portemonnaie-ry," said she, clutching it tighter, but holding the flowers to her nose all the while. "O, fudge ! Well, what else you got in your pocket ? A handkerchief? " "No, my hangerfiss is in my muff." "That? Why, there isn'ta speck o' lace on it. Nice little ladies always has lace. Here's a letter in the corner; what is it?
Page 48 - Pray,' said the little one, in a tone of command. Then, in a fine, squeaking voice, Fly repeated a prayer. It was intended to be Flipperty's voice, and Flipperty was too young to talk plain. "
Page 107 - tain't wuth lookin" at," said the crafty old woman, who saw at a glance it was pure linen, and quite fine. " Now run along, baby ; your mummer will be waitin' for you." Fly walked on slowly. Ought she to have parted with her very best hangerfiss ! " Nice ole lady, loved little gee-urls ; but what you s'posc folks was goin' to cry into now ? " Tears started at the thought.
Page 136 - ... Madge, turning away from the window. "Ask 'bout her nose, too." " Whose nose, Fly ? " " The woman's. It keeps a-moving when she talks." "There, who else noticed that?" exclaimed Horace, tossing his young sister aloft. " It takes Fly, with her little eye, to see things." "But I didn't ask her nuffin 'bout it, though, Horace Clifford. God made her so, with a wire in.
Page 24 - ... to her before her mother was born, and a great deal more since. Sometimes it was dropsy, and she had to be tapped, when pints of sawdust would run out. Sometimes it was consumption, and she wasted to such a skeleton that she had to be revived with cotton. She had lost her head more than once, but it never affected her brains : she was all the better with a young head now and then on her old shoulders. Her present ailment appeared to be small-pox; she was badly pitted with pins and a penknife....
Page 106 - That old pocket-book will do, though 'tain't wuth much." It was very surprising to Fly to hear her port-monnaie called old; for it was bought last week, and was still as red as the cheeks of the painted lady. " I don't doss to give folks my portemonnaie-ry," said she, clutching it tighter, but holding the flowers to her nose all the while. "O, fudge ! Well, what else you got in your pocket ? A handkerchief? " "No, my hangerfiss is in my muff.
Page 153 - Fly, was holding on to Horace's thumb, saying, as she skipped along, — "I hope the doctor'll take a knife, and pick Maria's eyes open, so she can see." "Precious little you care whether she can see or not," said Dotty. " I don't think Fly has much feeling, — do you, Prudy ? — not like you and I, I mean !" " Pshaw ! what do you expect of such a baby?

Bibliographic information