Introduction to Superstrings and M-Theory

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 30, 1999 - Science - 587 pages
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Superstrings and M-theory: provocative and controversial, but unarguably one of the most interesting and active areas of research in current physics. Called by some, "the theory of everything," superstrings may solve a problem that has eluded physicists for the past 50 years, the final unification of the two great theories of the twentieth century, general relativity and quantum field theory. Now, here is a thoroughly revised, second edition of a course-tested comprehensive introductory graduate text on superstrings which stresses the most current areas of interest, not covered in other presentations, including: · Four-dimensional superstrings · Kac-Moody algebras · Teichmüller spaces and Calabi-Yau manifolds · M-theory Membranes and D-branes · Duality and BPS relations · Matrix models The book begins with a simple discussion of point particle theory, and uses Feynman path integrals to unify the presentation of superstrings. It has been updated throughout, and three new chapters on M-theory have been added. Prerequisites are an acquaintance with quantum mechanics and relativity.
 

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Contents

IV
3
V
7
VI
18
VII
25
VIII
28
IX
30
X
34
XI
37
LXXX
335
LXXXI
337
LXXXII
341
LXXXIII
346
LXXXIV
348
LXXXV
353
LXXXVI
357
LXXXVII
366

XII
40
XIII
44
XIV
47
XV
49
XVI
60
XVII
67
XVIII
70
XIX
72
XX
78
XXI
84
XXII
87
XXIII
90
XXIV
95
XXV
99
XXVI
101
XXVII
104
XXVIII
111
XXIX
117
XXX
119
XXXI
123
XXXII
126
XXXIII
128
XXXIV
134
XXXV
136
XXXVI
139
XXXVII
141
XXXVIII
150
XXXIX
155
XL
158
XLI
165
XLII
167
XLIII
170
XLIV
174
XLVI
177
XLVII
178
XLVIII
181
XLIX
185
L
192
LI
195
LII
200
LIII
210
LIV
217
LV
221
LVI
224
LVII
226
LVIII
238
LIX
242
LX
245
LXI
247
LXII
250
LXIII
254
LXIV
261
LXV
267
LXVI
272
LXVII
275
LXVIII
280
LXIX
286
LXX
290
LXXI
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LXXII
297
LXXIII
300
LXXIV
303
LXXV
308
LXXVI
311
LXXVII
317
LXXVIII
328
LXXIX
331
LXXXVIII
368
LXXXIX
372
XC
373
XCI
378
XCII
383
XCIII
386
XCIV
388
XCV
391
XCVI
395
XCVII
398
XCVIII
400
XCIX
403
C
404
CI
409
CII
413
CIII
419
CIV
426
CV
428
CVI
432
CVII
434
CVIII
438
CIX
449
CX
453
CXI
455
CXII
457
CXIII
458
CXIV
460
CXV
462
CXVI
465
CXVII
466
CXVIII
469
CXIX
471
CXX
473
CXXII
476
CXXIII
480
CXXIV
482
CXXV
484
CXXVI
488
CXXVII
490
CXXVIII
491
CXXIX
494
CXXX
496
CXXXI
497
CXXXII
499
CXXXIII
501
CXXXIV
502
CXXXV
504
CXXXVI
510
CXXXVII
511
CXXXVIII
513
CXXXIX
516
CXL
517
CXLI
521
CXLII
525
CXLIII
532
CXLIV
537
CXLV
542
CXLVI
544
CXLVII
545
CXLIX
557
CL
561
CLI
566
CLII
573
CLIII
577
CLIV
579
CLV
581
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About the author (1999)

Michio Kaku was born January 24, 1947 in San Jose California. Kaku attended Cubberley High School in Palo Alto in the early 1960s and played first board on their chess team. At the National Science Fair in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he attracted the attention of physicist Edward Teller, who took Kaku as a protégé, awarding him the Hertz Engineering Scholarship. Kaku graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University with a B.S. degree in 1968 and was first in his physics class. He attended the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley and received a Ph.D. in 1972 and held a lectureship at Princeton University in 1973. During the Vietnam War, Kaku completed his U.S. Army basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia and his advanced infantry training at Fort Lewis, Washington. Kaku currently holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics and a joint appointment at City College of New York, and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he has lectured for more than 30 years. He is engaged in defining the "Theory of Everything", which seeks to unify the four fundamental forces of the universe: the strong nuclear force, the weak nuclear force, gravity and electromagnetism. He was a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and New York University. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He is listed in Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and American Men and Women of Science. He has published research articles on string theory from 1969 to 2000. In 1974, along with Prof. K. Kikkawa, he wrote the first paper on string field theory, now a major branch of string theory, which summarizes each of the five string theories into a single equation. In addition to his work on string field theory, he also authored some of the first papers on multi-loop amplitudes in string theory. Kaku is the author of several doctoral textbooks on string theory and quantum field theory and has published 170 articles in journals covering topics such as superstring theory, supergravity, supersymmetry, and hadronic physics. He is also author of the popular science books: Visions, Hyperspace, Einstein's Cosmos, Parallel Worlds, and The Future of the Mind.

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