An Historical and Critical Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland: From the Reign of Queen Elizabeth to the Settlement Under King William. : With the State of the Irish Catholics, from that Settlement to the Relaxation of the Popery Laws, in the Year 1778. Extracted from Parliamentary Records, State Acts, and Other Authentic Materials

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R. Conolly, 1810 - Catholic emancipation - 660 pages
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Contents

The greater and better part of the Irish in this war fought for the queen against their countrymen The hard terms on which they were received to mer...
43
Tirome sues for pardon and obtains it
46
The state of the Irish under James I
49
A general act of oblivion
55
Sir Arthur Chichesters government
63
The conspiracy and flight of the earls
68
Warm contests in the Irish house of commons
75
Some account of the ecclesiastical courts at that juncture in Ireland
88
The patience and submission of the natives
89
BOOK III
92
The free gift or contribution continued for the service
99
ment
105
A free gift raised for the king chiefly by the natives for 12
124
BOOK IV
125
Further distress of the people of Connaught
132
Some invidious reflections on the foregoing passage consi
138
The immediate cause of the insurrection in 1641
147
Some misrepresentations concerning the beginning of
153
BOOK V
159
16
164
The rnasssncre in IslandMagec
165
The original depositions now in the possession of the uni
174
The original examinations further considered
177
Concerning the number of murders
178
The humanity of the chiefs of the insurgents
181
The conduct of the catholic clergy during the insurrection
189
The first cause of the insurrections increasing
192
The same subject continued
194
Further misconduct of the lords justices
197
The nobility and gentry of the pale banished from Dublin
200
The justices invite the lords of the pale to a conference
201
The gentlemen of the pale assemble at Swords
204
The lords justices violate the public faith
205
The order for a general pardon limited by the justices
207
XVIL Lords justices orders concerning Roman catholic priests
211
XVIll The cause of the insurrection in Munster
213
The cause of the insurrection in Gonnaught
217
Further severities of the lords justices
220
The gentlemen of the pale petition the king and parlia ment
222
Barbarous orders of the lords justices and council to the earl of Oimond
225
Orders of the English parliament relative to Ireland
227
BOOK VI
229
The king consents to hear the grievances of the insur gents
233
Another contrivance of the justices to hinder the cessation
235
Sir William Parsons displaced from the government
239
His majestys commissioners meet those of the confederate catholics to treat of the cessation
241
The cessation at last concluded
243
The advantages of the cessation to his majestys army
246
The cessation violated by his majestys forces in Ulster
248
The covenant brought into Ireland further breaches of the cessation by the Scotch and English forces
250
The revolt of lord Inchiquin
253
The confederates send supplies to the king
255
The confederates press the marquis of Ormond to take the command of their forces
260
Xin The king sends Ormond a commission to conclude a peace with the confederates
263
The treaty of peace adjourned
265
The earl of Clanrickard expostulates with Ormond upon hit last answer to the confederates commissioners
268
The marquis of Ormond ordered to leave the castle
330
Ormond prepares to leave the kingdom Is pressed
338
Char PAGE
341
The happy effects of this peace Ormonds defeat at Rath
347
Owen ONial submits to the peace Inchiquins forces
353
The king is invited to Scotland
360
the Scots
366
The presbytery of Bangors proceedings on the peace
373
Treaty with the duke of Lorrain
379
BOOK IX
386
Henry Cromwells administration in Ireland
398
The Irish catholics excluded out of the general act of obli
404
The parties principally suspected of this conspiracy volun
412
The affairs of Ireland brought before the English council
426
The time limited for holding these courts found too short
436
Some reflections on the foregoing acts 44f
443
The probable motives of the duke of Ormonds past
450
32
454
BOOK X
459
The behaviour of the Irish priests and new recruits under
469
1X A conspiracy of the protestants of Dublin against the
478
King James countermands De Rosens order
487
Cnap w XIV King Williams treatment of the episcopal clergy in Scotland compared with King Jamess behaviour towards the protestant clergy in Irela...
494
The true cause of the decline of the protestant religion in Ireland in the reign of King James II
496
The perplexity of the established clergy of Ireland after the coronation of King William
498
The established clergy of Ireland laboured under a particu lar difficulty on this occasion
500
The good faith of King Williams and King Jamess officers compared
501
A short sketch of the cruelties inflicted on the Irish prisoners in this war and also on those even under protection
506
Surrender of Limerick with the articles of capitulation STATE of THE CATHoLics of IRELAND
509
Severe laws made against catholics
528
The catholics of Limerick cruelly treated
531
Penal laws to prevent the further growth of popery
533
The same subject continued
536
Persecution of the catholics in the reign of Q Anne vii Penal laws of discovery and gavelkind enacted
544
Reasons assigned for making those laws
546
Persecution in the reign of King George I
552
The catholics address his majesty King George II
556
rebellion in Scotland 1745
559
The catholics of Ireland pressed by penal laws form an humble remonstrance to be presented to his majesty
560
Tumults in Munster considered
567
The same subject continued
568
Reflections on the foregoing subject
575
Some prospect of mitigating the rigour of the popery laws XX The catholics of Ireland state their grievances in an humble address and petition to the ...
579
APPENDIX No 1 A brief declaration of the government of Irelandby captain Thomas Lee 1594
587
Remonstrance of divers Lords of the pale to the king con cerning the Irish parliament in 1613
609
Abstract of the report and return of commissioner? sent
612
committed on the Irish in Ireland since the 23d
623
VIII Intelligence from his majestys army in Scotland to the lord
633
The heads of the causes which moved the northern Irish
640
Extract of Dr Gorgehis letter to colonel Hamilton
646
The coronation oath of James Hi 66t
660
544
38
41
58?
7

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Page 514 - The Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II...
Page xv - ... and images; nay even their transubstantiation. But while they acknowledge a foreign power, superior to the sovereignty of the kingdom, they cannot complain if the laws of that kingdom will not treat them upon the footing of good subjects.
Page 515 - ... provided also, that no person whatsoever shall have or enjoy the benefit of this article, that shall neglect or refuse to take the oath of allegiance,* made by act of parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their present majesties, when thereunto required.
Page 517 - ... creditors, at the instance of the Lord Lucan, and the rest 'of the persons aforesaid, it is agreed, that the said Lords Justices, and the said Baron De Ginckle, shall intercede with the King and parliament, to have the estates secured to Roman Catholics, by articles and capitulation in this kingdom, charged with, and equally liable to the payment of so much of the said debts, as the said Lord Lucan, upon stating accounts with the said John Brown, shall certify under his hand, that the effects...
Page 517 - Tyrconnel and Lord Lucan, took away the effects the said John Brown had to answer the said debts, and promised to clear the said John Brown of the said debts, which effects were...
Page 518 - And all such as are under their protection in the said counties," hereby for us, our heirs and successors, ordaining and declaring, that all and every person and persons therein concerned, shall and may have, receive, and enjoy the benefit thereof, in such and the same manner, as if the said words had been inserted in their proper place, in the said second article ; any omission, defect, or mistake in the said second article, in any wise notwithstanding.
Page 529 - Whilst this restraint of foreign and domestic education was part of an horrible and impious system of servitude, the members were well fitted to the body. To render men patient under a deprivation of all the rights of human nature, everything which could give them a knowledge or feeling of those rights was rationally forbidden. To render humanity fit to be insulted, it was fit that it should be degraded.
Page 42 - And no spectacle was more frequent in the ditches of towns, and especially in wasted countries, than to see multitudes of these poor people dead with their mouths all coloured green by eating nettles, docks, and all things they could rend up above ground.
Page 518 - ... or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made good, it being within the intention of the capitulation, and inserted in the foul draft thereof.
Page 25 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...

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