The Christological Controversy

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Richard Alfred Norris
Fortress Press, 1980 - Religion - 162 pages
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Series Foreword I. Introduction Early Christology Initial Problems Justin Martyr, Melito of Sardis, Irenaeus of Lyon, Tertullian of Carthage, Origen of Alexandria Further Problems The Arians and Athanasius; Apollinaris of Laodicea; Theodore of Mopsuestia; Cyril, Nestorius, and Eutyches; Leo and Chalcedon II. Melito of Sardis A Homily on the Passover III. Irenaeus of Lyon Against Heresies IV. Tertullian Against Praxeas On the Flesh of Christ V. Origen On First Principles VI. Athanasius Orations against the Arians VII. Apollinaris of Laodicea On the Union in Christ of the Body with the Godhead Fragments VIII. Theodore of Mopsuestia Fragments of the Doctrinal Works IX. The Controversies Leading Up to the Council of Chalcedon Nestorius's First Sermon against the Theotokos Cyril of Alexandria's Second Letter to Nestorius Nestorius's Second Letter to Cyril Cyril's Letter to John of Antioch Pope Leo I's Letter to Flavian of Constantinople The Council of Chalcedon's "Definition of the Faith" Bibliography
 

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Contents

Melito of Sardis
33
Irenaeus of Lyon
49
Tertullian
61
On the Flesh of Christ
64
Origen
73
Athanasius
83
Apollinaris of Laodicea
103
Fragments
107
The Controversies Leading Up to the Council of Chalcedon
123
Cyril of Alexandrias Second Letter to Nestorius
131
Nestoriuss Second Letter to Cyril
135
Cyrils Letter to John of Antioch
140
Pope Leo Is Letter to Flavian of Constantinople
145
The Council of Chalcedons Definition of the Faith
155
Bibliography
161
Copyright

Theodore of Mopsuestia
113

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Page 3 - He is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities — all things were created through him and for him. He is before all things and in him all things hold together.
Page 3 - Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.

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About the author (1980)

Norris is Professor Emeritus of Church History at Union Theological Seminary, New York City, Priest Associate of the Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch, and Diocesan Canon in the Diocese of New York. He has taught and written extensively on the history and development of doctrine in the early church.

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