Caring for America's Alzheimer's Victims: Hearing Before the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, March 30, 1989

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 47 - T. FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, MD DIRECTOR NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES BEFORE THE US SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE ON AGING SENATE LABOR AND HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE JUNE 26, 1986 Mr.
Page 43 - ... home care benefits, and; o consumers ' lack of knowledge about the need for protection against long-term care expenses. In addition, people in need often cannot purchase private longterm care insurance. Few companies will sell insurance to people age 80 or over, or to people with pre-existing (potentially disabling) medical conditions. This practice may be necessary to maintain the financial stability of the insurance plan, but it leaves those most likely to need long-term care without any protection....
Page 39 - ... 1) relatively few persons in our society need long-term care at any one time; 2) it is nearly impossible to predict who these individuals will be; and 3) the lifetime risk of needing nursing home care is much higher than most people think.
Page 42 - Providers would not be penalized when residents' functioning declines as a result of a debilitating disease. To contain cost increases under Medicaid, almost all states use some form of prospective payment for nursing homes. This type of reimbursement system encourages facilities to contain costs because they are not reimbursed for charges that exceed the payment rate. For example, if a facility spends more than the prospective rate allows on administrative overhead, it will not be paid for the excess...
Page 42 - ... excess charges. Under any program, it is essential to use a payment system that keeps cost increases at reasonable levels. However, payment rates should not be so low as to undermine delivery of quality care. With regard to payment for home care, there is less of a track record at the state level. Thus, there is a need for research to determine the best methods of paying for home care. The research should focus on prospective payment that accounts for casemix and outcomes. Such a payment system...
Page 43 - The Role of the Private Sector Private sector options for financing long-term care include private long-term care insurance, home equity conversion plans, and the prospect of long-term care individual medical accounts. Although long-term care insurance offers some promise as a way to augment a federal social insurance program it is still in its infancy and there are major barriers to its development. While the number of policies in force (estimated at 1,000,000) is growing, they cover few of the...
Page 84 - The hearing is adjourned. [Whereupon, at 12:10 pm, the hearing was adjourned...
Page 8 - Improve the care of patients with AD. * Makes initial grants available for 3 years with funding at a minimum of $250,000 per year and subject to an annual evaluation by the Department of Health and Human Services. States are required to provide matching funds at a 50-50 rate. Total program funding is set at $50 million for 1990, $100 million for 1991, and $125 million for 1992.
Page 10 - Disease. (Effective 12 months after enactment). The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is directed to modify the Medicare and Medicaid programs to review and, as needed, modify reimbursement for home health services, extended care services, and inpatient hospital services to reflect more accurately the cost of caring for advanced stages of AD. Sec.
Page 8 - A joint federal/state effort Is established to develop services and policies to assist victims of AD and their families. All SO States and territories may receive grants to create State Alzheimer's Programs. * Develops diagnostic, treatment, care management, legal counseling, and educational services for care providers, victims, and their families. Makes available respite care services (Including, but not limited to, home health, day care, companion, short term stay In health facilities), for the...

Bibliographic information