Electromagnetic Theory, Volume 1

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"The Electrician" printing and publishing Company, limited, 1893 - Earth
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Contents

I
1
II
20
III
132
IV
306

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Page 452 - Newton generalized the law of attraction into a statement that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force which varies directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between them; and he thence deduced the law of attraction for spherical shells of constant density.
Page 146 - ... the reign of Euclid continues. My own idea of a useful course is to begin with arithmetic, and then, not Euclid, but algebra. Next, not Euclid, but practical geometry, solid as well as plane ; not demonstrations, but to make acquaintance.
Page 134 - The quaternion and its laws were discovered by that extraordinary genius Sir W. Hamilton. A quaternion is neither a scalar nor a vector, but a sort of combination of both. It has no physical representatives, but is a highly abstract mathematical concept. It is the operator which turns one vector into another.
Page 134 - Hamilton. A quaternion is neither a scalar, nor a vector, but a sort of combination of both. It has no physical representatives, but is a highly abstract mathematical concept. It is the " operator " which turns one vector into another.
Page 441 - Vol. 1, published in 1893, Heaviside considers 2 on page 441 " various ways, good and bad, of increasing the inductance of circuits." He suggests on page 445, the use of inductance in isolated lumps. This means the insertion of inductance coils at intervals in the main circuit.
Page 135 - Even Prof. Willard Gibbs must be ranked as one of the retarders of quaternion progress, in virtue of his pamphlet on Vector Analysis; a sort of hermaphrodite monster, compounded of the notations of Hamilton and of Grassmann . '
Page 73 - The principle of the continuity of energy is a special form of that of its conservation. In the ordinary understanding of the conservation principle it is the integral amount of energy that is conserved, and nothing is said about its distribution or its motion. This involves continuity of existence in time, but not necessarily in space also. But if we can localise energy definitely in space, then we are bound to ask how energy gets from place to place.

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