Fairy Tales from All Nations

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Harper, 1850 - Fairy tales - 359 pages
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Contents

I
13
II
20
III
32
IV
47
V
50
VI
76
VII
78
VIII
106
XVI
208
XVII
214
XVIII
219
XIX
237
XX
248
XXII
273
XXIII
276
XXIV
291

IX
128
X
132
XI
161
XII
174
XIII
183
XIV
188
XV
190
XXV
299
XXVI
304
XXVII
318
XXVIII
332
XXIX
338
XXX
350

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Page 78 - Mark this, friend," said the man of Bassora to the one of Kufa — "butter is compared with bread as being the better of the two : as we can only consume a small quantity of that, it will also be the cheaper — and we shall therefore...
Page 79 - They then went to the butter-merchant, and asked if he had good butter. " Gw>d, indeed, and flavory and fresh as the finest olive oil," was the answer. " Mark this, also," said the host to his guest : '• oil is compared with the best butter, and, therefore, by much ought to be preferred to the latter." They next went to the oil-vender. " Have you good oil ?" " The very best quality : white and transparent as water,'
Page 190 - Be off with you, or I'll swallow you." The frog, however, replied: "Don't give yourself such airs ; I am swifter than you !" At this the fox laughed; but as the frog persisted in boasting of his swiftness, the fox said at length : " Now, then, we will both run to the next town and we shall see which can go the faster.
Page 191 - Off went the fi'X, and when he reached the gate of the city, he turned again to see if he could spy the frog coming after him. As he did so, the frog hopped out. of his tail on to the ground. The fox, after looking all about without being able to see the frog, turned round once more, in order to enter the city. Then the frog called out to him, "So, you are come, at last? I am just going back again, for I really thought you meant not to come at all.
Page 26 - what sort of a thing you have taken for your Queen ; here she has eaten up her own babe." Then the King was so downcast, he almost burst into tears, and said, — "Yes, it must be true, since I see it with my own eyes ; but she'll not do it again, I'm sure, and so this time I'll spare her life.
Page 297 - There was a hole in the roof over the fireplace which might be opened and shut either to let in the light from above, or to afford a free passage for the smoke. Orm lifted up the lid, which was covered with a skin, and put out his head. But what a wonderful sight then presented itself to his eyes ! The little islands around were all lit up with countless blue lights, which moved about without ceasing, jumped up and down, then skipped down to the shore, assembled together, and...
Page 23 - 'twere a shame to kill her for that. She has nothing to do with our suffering ill; for if any one's to blame, it's our own mother." So they set to work hunting for her both high and low, and at last they looked under all the beds, and so when they came to the youngest Prince's bed, they found her, and dragged her out. Then the eldest Prince wished again to have her killed, but she begged and prayed so prettily for herself. "Oh! gracious goodness ! don't kill me, for I've gone about seeking you these...
Page 190 - FOX came one day at full speed to a pond to drink. A frog who was sitting there, began to croak at him. Then, said the fox, " Be off with you, or I'll swallow you." The frog, however, replied: "Don't give yourself such airs ; I am swifter than you...
Page 293 - They could not venture to land, for Aslog's father was lord of the whole coast, and they would infallibly fall into his hands. Nothing then remained for them but to commit their bark to the wind and waves. They drove along the entire night. At break of day the coast had disappeared, and they saw nothing but the sky above, the sea beneath, and the waves that rose and fell. They had not brought...
Page 338 - I swear to you that I will do all in my power to protect you from any injury.

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