Ozma of Oz

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Reilly & Lee Company, 1907 - Children's stories - 270 pages
10 Reviews
Uncle Henry has been ordered by his doctor to take a vacation from his Kansas farm to Australia. He and his niece Dorothy Gale are aboard a steamship traveling there when they are caught in a fierce storm and separated. Dorothy is blown overboard along with a yellow hen called Billina from her uncle's farm that was on the ship. They arrive in the country of Ev where they eventually join Princess Ozma in her effort to rescue the royal family of that land.
 

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This is a wonderful story; it's marvelous that it still relevant 100 years later.
Baum and the illustrator created an amazing composition encompassing a literary equilibrium: word and picture content
that seems child-friendly at is surface, but musing of the full implications and social commentary reveals that the contact is actually dark---sending a child into battle and numerous skirmishes with creatures.
I deeply wish a new film will eventually capture Baum's full content and darkness as well as the Progressive Era social commentary; the 1985 film "Return to Oz" came close.
Here are some very artistic fan-trailers of L. Frank Baum's books.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ow2VUNzxO8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwuO2esN5ho
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4mFrCXuxs0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nZ04EpkeL0
 

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This is an amazing book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Contents

I
13
II
24
III
37
IV
49
V
64
VI
76
VII
101
VIII
107
XII
156
XIII
175
XIV
182
XV
191
XVI
205
XVII
216
XVIII
226
XIX
235

IX
117
X
128
XI
141
XX
254
XXI
263

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Page 166 - He had a broad face and a little round belly That shook, when he laughed, like a bowl full of jelly.
Page 96 - Better than that, ma'am," said Dorothy. "I came from Kansas." "Huh!" cried the Princess, scornfully. "You are a foolish child, and I cannot allow you to annoy me. Run away, you little goose, and bother some one else." Dorothy was so indignant that for a moment she could find no words to reply. But she rose from her chair, and was about to leave the room when the Princess, who had been scanning the girl's face, stopped her by saying, more gently: "Come nearer to me.
Page 44 - It had the form of a man, except that it walked, or rather rolled, upon all fours, and its legs were the same length as its arms, giving them the appearance of the four legs of a beast. Yet it was no beast that Dorothy had discovered, for the person was clothed most gorgeously in embroidered garments of many colors, and wore a straw hat perched jauntily upon the side of its head. But it differed from human beings in this respect, that instead of hands and feet there grew at the end of its arms and...
Page 54 - Reassured, Dorothy remembers the Tin Man. and makes a comparison. "But he [the Tin Man] was as alive as we are, 'cause he was born a real man, and got his tin body a little at a time — first a leg and then a finger and then an ear — for the reason that he had so many accidents with his ax.
Page 221 - ... chances are that they have been good boys and girls for some time, because they couldn't help it." "Oh, my poor darlings!" cried the Queen, with a sob of anguish. "Not at all," returned the hen. "Don't let their condition make you unhappy, ma'am, because I'll soon have them crowding 'round to bother and worry you as naturally as ever. Come with me, if you please, and I'll show you how pretty they look.
Page 40 - Inside she found, nicely wrapped in white papers, a ham sandwich, a piece of sponge-cake, a pickle, a slice of new cheese and an apple. Each thing had a separate stem, and so had to be picked off the side of the box; but Dorothy found them all to be delicious, and she ate every bit of luncheon in the box before she had finished. "A lunch isn't zactly breakfast," she said to Billina, who sat beside her curiously watching. "But when one is hungry one can eat even supper in the morning, and not complain.
Page 26 - I've clucked and cackled all my life, and never spoken a word before this morning, that I can remember. But when you asked a question, a minute ago, it seemed the most natural thing in the world to answer you. So I spoke, and I seem to keep on speaking, just as you and other human beings do. Strange, isn't it?
Page 52 - Good gracious!" cried Dorothy, shrinking back as far as the narrow path would let her. For, standing within the narrow chamber of rock, was the form of a man — or, at least, it seemed like a man, in the dim light. He was only about as tall as Dorothy herself, and his body was round as a ball and made out of burnished copper. Also his head and limbs were copper, and these were jointed or hinged to his body in a peculiar way, with metal caps over the joints, like the armor worn by knights in days...
Page 39 - Lunch" could be read, in neat raised letters. This tree seemed to bear all the year around, for there were lunch-box blossoms on some of the branches, and on others tiny little lunch-boxes that were as yet quite green, and evidently not fit to eat until they had grown bigger. The leaves of this tree were all paper napkins, and it presented a very pleasing appearance to the hungry little girl.
Page 123 - ... door with a strut of proud defiance and a cluck of victory, while the speckled rooster limped away to the group of other chickens, trailing his crumpled plumage in the dust as he went. "Why, Billina!

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