The Ecology of Language Evolution

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 30, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 255 pages
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This major new work explores the development of creoles and other new languages, focusing on the conceptual and methodological issues they raise for genetic linguistics. Written by an internationally renowned linguist, the book surveys a wide range of examples of changes in the structure, function and vitality of languages, and suggests that similar ecologies have played the same kinds of roles in all cases of language evolution. The Ecology of Language Evolution will be welcomed by students and researchers in sociolinguistics, creolistics, theoretical linguistics and theories of evolution.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
12 Pidgins creoles and koinés
3
13 Language evolution
11
14 Thinking of a language as a species
15
15 What is the ecology of language?
21
The Founder Principle in the development of Creoles
25
21 Introduction
27
what the histories of individual colonies suggest
33
51 Preliminaries
127
52 Some noteworthy facts on the development of creoles
130
53 Ecology and linguistic evolution
136
54 Creolization as a social process
138
55 The role of contact in the histories of English and French
139
whence the significance of variation
141
57 Some conclusions
142
Language contact evolution and death how ecology rolls the dice
145

23 Evidence for the Founder Principle
62
24 Conclusions
75
The development of American Englishes factoring contact in and the social bias out
81
32 Why are WAEVs White American English Vernaculars not creoles?
83
33 The development of AAE AfricanAmerican English
86
a creole perspective
98
35 Conclusions
103
The legitimate and illegitimate offspring of English
106
41 Introduction
107
42 An insidious naming tradition
108
43 How language contact has been downplayed
109
when does substrate influence matter?
112
45 The significance of ethnographic ecology
115
46 Mutual intelligibility and the contact history of English
118
47 The cost of capitalizing on mutual intelligibility
122
48 In conclusion
123
What research on the development of Creoles can contribute to genetic linguistics
126
62 Languages as a species
148
63 The ecology of language
153
64 In conclusion how history repeats itself
163
Past and recent population movements in Africa their impact on its linguistic landscape
167
72 The linguistic impact of European colonization
170
73 Population movements and language contacts in precolonial Africa
180
74 The linguistic consequences of Black populations precolonial dispersal
184
Conclusions the big picture
192
82 Language vitality and endangerment as aspects of language evolution
199
83 Integration and segregation as key ecological factors in language evolution
200
84 Colonization styles and language evolution
204
85 Overall
207
Notes
208
References
226
Author index
246
Subject index
249
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About the author (2001)

Salikoko S. Mufwene is the Frank J. McLoraine Distinguished Service Professor of Linguistics and the College at the University of Chicago.

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