Abraham Lincoln: A History, Volume 6

Front Cover
Century Company, 1890 - Presidents
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Contents

I
1
II
30
III
49
IV
68
V
90
VI
113
VII
131
VIII
147
XII
253
XIII
273
XIV
297
XV
314
XVI
343
XVII
354
XVIII
367
XIX
399

IX
173
X
196
XI
223

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Page 347 - It follows from these views that no State upon its own mere motion can lawfully get out of the Union ; that resolves and ordinances to that effect are legally void; and that acts of violence, within any State or States, against the authority of the United States, are insurrectionary or revolutionary, according to circumstances.
Page 413 - Portsmouth and which excepted parts are for the present left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued and by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid i do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated states and parts of states are and henceforward shall be free and that the executive government of the united states including the military and naval authorities thereof will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons...
Page 236 - ... lawful money and a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private, within the United States, except duties on imports and interest as aforesaid.
Page 413 - States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and Government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly...
Page 168 - That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state, or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward and forever free...
Page 442 - And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense; and I recommend to them that in all cases when allowed they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. And I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.
Page 153 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 413 - Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and Government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion...
Page 155 - What good would a proclamation of emancipation from me do, especially as we are now situated ? I do not want to issue a document that the whole world will see must necessarily be inoperative, like the Pope's bull against the comet.
Page 341 - The importance for man and beast of the prescribed weekly rest, the sacred rights of Christian soldiers and sailors, a becoming deference to the best sentiment of a Christian people, and a due regard for the Divine Will demand that Sunday labor in the Army and Navy be reduced to the measure of strict necessity. The discipline and character of the national forces should not suffer nor the cause they defend be imperiled by the profanation of the day or name of the Most High. 'At this time of public...

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