What I Saw in California: Being the Journal of a Tour by the Emigrant Route and South Pass of the Rocky Mountains, Across the Continent of North America, the Great Desert Basin, and Through California in the Years 1846-1847 ...

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1849 - California - 480 pages
 

Contents

I
13
II
19
III
32
IV
45
V
60
VI
74
VII
92
VIII
111
XX
249
XXI
265
XXII
275
XXIII
286
XXIV
299
XXV
313
XXVI
325
XXVII
333

IX
125
X
138
XI
150
XII
163
XIII
169
XIV
182
XV
194
XVI
206
XVII
218
XVIII
234
XIX
244
XXVIII
340
XXIX
346
XXX
358
XXXI
365
XXXII
375
XXXIII
384
XXXIV
394
XXXV
405
XXXVI
417
XXXVII
427
XXXVIII
441

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Page 432 - The Americans and Californians are now but one people ; let us cherish one wish, one hope, and let that be for the peace and quiet of our country. Let us as a band of brothers unite and emulate each other in our exertions to benefit and improve this our beautiful, and which soon must be our happy and prosperous home.
Page 291 - California, they were denied the privilege of buying or renting lands of their friends, who, instead of being allowed to participate in or being protected by a Republican Government, were oppressed by a military despotism...
Page 291 - I further declare that I rely upon the rectitude of our intentions, the favor of Heaven, and the bravery of those who are bound and associated with me by the principles of self-preservation, by the love of truth, and the hatred of tyranny, for my hopes of success. "I furthermore declare that I believe that a government, to be prosperous and happy, must originate with the people, who are friendly to its existence; that the citizens are its guardians, the officers its servants, its glory its reward....
Page 177 - ... us. Very soon the fifteen or twenty figures were multiplied into three or four hundred, and appeared to be marching forward with the greatest action and speed. I then conjectured that they might be Capt. Fremont and his party with others, from California, returning to the United States by this route, although they seemed to be too numerous even for this. I spoke to Brown, who was nearest to me, and asked him if he noticed the figures of men and horses in front? He answered that he did, and that...
Page 431 - To the coininander-in-chief of the naval forces the President has assigned the regulation of the import trade, the conditions on which vessels of all nations, our own as well as foreign, may be admitted into the ports of the Territory, and the establishment of all port regulations. To the commanding military officer the President has assigned the direction of the operations on land, and has invested him with administrative functions of government over the people and territory occupied by the forces...
Page 260 - ... next in finding their cattle, then ten or twelve feet under the snow, and did not know the spot or near it; they have done it ere this.—28.
Page 264 - The bones of those who had died and been devoured by the miserable ones that still survived, were lying around their tents and cabins. Bodies of men, women, and children, with half the flesh torn from them, lay on every side. A woman sat by the...
Page 296 - All churches and the property they contain, in possession of the clergy of California, shall continue in the same rights and possessions they now enjoy. All provisions and supplies of every kind furnished by the inhabitants for the use of the United States ships and soldiers will be paid for at fair rates; and no private property will be taken for public use without just compensation at the moment. John D. Sloat, commander-in-chief of the United States naval force in the Pacific Ocean.
Page 178 - ... fine particles of crystallized matter, or by the distant horizon, covered by the same substance. This induced a more minute observation of the phenomenon, in order to detect the deception, if such it were. I noticed a single figure, apparently in front in advance of all the others, and was struck with its likeness to myself.
Page 401 - ... on our front and rear. We soon silenced their guns and repelled the charge, when they fled and permitted us the next morning to march into town without any further opposition. We have rescued the country from the hands of the insurgents, but I fear that the absence of Colonel Fremont's battalion of mounted riflemen will enable most of the Mexican officers who have broken their pnrole to escape to Sonora.

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