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Books Books 1 - 10 of 65 on For, to say nothing of half the .birds, >and some quadrupeds, which are almost entirely....
" For, to say nothing of half the .birds, >and some quadrupeds, which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil,... "
The Quarterly Journal Of Agriculture - Page 146
by William Blackwood - 1831
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Animal Biography, Or, Authentic Anecdotes of the Lives, Manners ..., Volume 3

William Bingley - Zoology - 1803
...supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, (which would proceed but ill without them,) by boring, perforating, and loosening...all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure * Lumbiicu* terrcstris. Linn. for grain and grass. Worms...
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Animal Biography: Or, Authentic Anecdotes of the Lives, Manners, and Economy ...

William Bingley - Zoology - 1805
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks cf leaves and twigs into it : and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grain and grass. — Worms probably provide new soil...
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Rural Sports, Volume 2

William Barker Daniel - Fishing - 1812
...Quadrupeds, which are almost entirely supported by them, Worms seem to be great promoters of Vegetation, by perforating and loosening the Soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of earthy lumps, called Worm-casts, which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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Encyclopaedia Britannica: Or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ..., Volume 10

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1823
...supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation (which would proceed but ill •without them) by boring, perforating, and loosening...all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide new soil for...
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The Natural History of Reptiles and Serpents: To which is Added an Appendix ...

Reptiles - 1824 - 178 pages
...This they do by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, 'and rendering it open to receive rain and the fibres of plants, by drawing 'straws and stalks...all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps, called worm-casts, which form a tine manure for grass and corn ! Gardeners and farmers express their...
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The Natural History of Selborne

Gilbert White, Sir William Jardine - Natural history - 1829 - 343 pages
...her own young-" — WJ tatiou, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating1, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious...up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm- casts, which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide...
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The Edinburgh Literary Journal: Or, Weekly Register of Criticism ..., Volume 2

Wandering Jew - 1829
...arid loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and fibres of plants, by drawing stalk* of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by...up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-nuts which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide...
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A Description of More Than Three Hundred Animals: Interspersed with ...

Zoology - 1829 - 476 pages
...Though considered a great nuisance by gardeners, they bore, perforate, and loosen the soil, and render it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by...straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and chiefly by throwing infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grass...
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The Edinburgh literary journal; or, Weekly register of criticism and belles ...

1829
...and loosening the soil, and renderinc it pervious to rains and fibres of plants, by drawing ętalk "' leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing...up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-ra^ which being their excrement, is a fine manure for cram and grass. Worms probably provide new...
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Animal biography, or, Popular zoology, Volume 4

William Bingley - 1829
...back of each segment of its body, bearing a small bristle in each. SYNONYM. Lumbricus marimis, Linn. and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and chiefly, by throwing up infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grass...
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