Plotting Hitler's Death: The Story of German Resistance

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Macmillan, Sep 15, 1997 - History - 432 pages
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On July 20, 1944, as World War II reached its climax, a group of German anti-Nazi conspirators detonated a powerful bomb at the military headquarters of Adolf Hitler. Joachim Fest, acclaimed biographer of Hitler, recounts in vivid detail the events leading up to July 20, and for the first time reveals the full story of the German resistance.
 

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PLOTTING HITLER'S DEATH: The Story of the German Resistance

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Sure to fuel the continuing controversy over the response of German citizens to National Socialism. Fest is one of the preeminent scholars of the Nazi period whose previous books (Hitler, 1974; The ... Read full review

Plotting Hitler's death: the story of the German resistance

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Daniel Jonah Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners (LJ 3/15/96) again stirred an ongoing debate with his assertion that Germans willingly participated in Adoph Hitler's policies. Historian Fest ... Read full review

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Contents

THE RESISTANCE THAT NEVER WAS
7
THE ARMY SUCCUMBS
36
THE SEPTEMBER PLOT
71
FROM MUNICH TO ZOSSEN
102
THE NEW GENERATION
137
THE ARMY GROUPS
170
STAUFFENBERG
202
THE ELEVENTH HOUR
237
PERSECUTION AND JUDGMENT
292
THE WAGES OF FAILURE
324
NOTES
345
A NOTE ON THE TEXTS
370
CHRONOLOGY
372
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES
380
INDEX
401
Copyright

JULY 20 1944
255

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About the author (1997)

Joachim Fest is one of Germany's most prominent and respected journalists. Born in Berlin in 1926, Fest was drafted into the German army at the age of fifteen and spent two years as an American prisoner of war. He is the author of The Face of the Third Reich, praised by Hannhn Arendt as one of the most important books on the Second World War, and Hitler, of which Time wrote, "Fest tells the story as no non-German could, dispassionately, but from the inside." Fest lives near Frankfurt.

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