Songs from the Operas for Alto

Front Cover
Henry Edward Krehbiel
O. Ditson, 1909 - Operas - 176 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Popular passages

Page x - French models, there is a latent power and force in his expression of English words, whatever be the subject, that will make an unprejudiced native of this island feel, more than all the elegance, grace, and refinement of modern music, less happily applied, can do ; and this pleasure is communicated to us, not by the symmetry or rhythm of modern melody, but by his having tuned to the true accents of our mother-tongue, those notes of passion, which an inhabitant of this island would breathe in such...
Page x - Musick is yet but in its Nonage, a forward Child, which gives hope of what it may be hereafter in England, when the Masters of it shall find more Encouragement. 'Tis now learning Italian, which is its best Master, and studying a little of the French Air, to give it somewhat more of Gayety and Fashion. Thus being farther from the Sun, we are of later Growth than our Neighbour Countries, and must be content to shake off our Barbarity by degrees.
Page x - ... was equal to that of the greatest masters on the continent ; and though his dramatic style and recitative were formed, in a great measure, on French models, there is a latent power and force in his expression of English words, whatever be the subject, that will make an unprejudiced native of this island feel more than all the elegance, grace, and refinement of modern music less happily applied can do...
Page x - Purcell, whose genius, though less cultivated and polished, was equal to that of the greatest masters on the continent. And though his dramatic style and recitative were formed in a great measure on French models, there is a latent power and force in his expression of English words, whatever be the subject, that will make an unprejudiced native of this island feel, more than all the elegance, grace, and refinement of modern Music less happily applied, can do.
Page x - ... us, not by the symmetry or rhythm of modern melody, but by his having tuned to the true accents of our mother-tongue, those notes of passion which an inhabitant of this island would breathe in such situations as the words describe. And these indigenous expressions of passion Purcell had the power to enforce by the energy of modulation, which, on some occasions, was bold, affecting, and sublime." —
Page xii - I cannot quit Hasse and Gluck, without saying that it is very necessary to use discrimination in comparing them together. Hasse may be regarded as the Raphael, and I have already called Gluck the Michael Angelo of living composers. If the affected French expression...
Page xi - He is the most important of that group of composers who succeeded the first pioneers of the monodic style, based upon the modern tonal system, and who moulded and developed a musical idiom which served as the language of musical expression down to the days of Beethoven.
Page xi - ... of his accompaniments to his songs and choruses; and even in the general melody of the airs themselves : yet, in the accent, passion, and expression of English words, the vocal music of Purcell is, sometimes to my feelings, as superior to Handel's as an original poem to a translation.

Bibliographic information