Jesus and Gospel

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 8, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 239 pages
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'Gospel' initially referred to oral proclamation concerning Jesus Christ, but was later used to refer to four written accounts of the life of Jesus. How did this happen? Distinguished scholar Graham Stanton uses new evidence and fresh perspectives to tackle this controversial question. He also examines the earliest criticisms of Jesus, and early Christian addiction to the codex (book) format in place of the ubiquitous roll. With half the material previously unpublished, this timely and accessible book will be invaluable to New Testament scholars and students alike.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Jesus and Gospel
9
The fourfold Gospel
63
Jesus traditions and gospels in Justin Martyr and Irenaeus
92
The law of Christ and the Gospel
110
Jesus of Nazareth a magician and a false prophet who deceived Gods people?
127
Early objections to the resurrection of Jesus
148
Why were early Christians addicted to the codex?
165
What are the gospels? New evidence from papyri?
192
Bibliography
207
Index of passages cited
220
General index
233
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About the author (2004)

Graham Stanton is Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College. His publications include Gospel Truth? New Light on Jesus and the Gospels (1995), A Gospel for a New People: Studies in Matthew (1992), The Gospels and Jesus (1989; revised and expanded 2002) and Jesus of Nazareth in New Testament Preaching (1974).