Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

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Penguin, Jul 25, 2006 - Science - 208 pages
16 Reviews
Redesigned inside and out to have a fresh, appealing look, this new edition of a classic Crown Trade Paperback is a collection of Einstein's own popular writings on his work and describes the meaning of his main theories in a way virtually everyone can understand.
 

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Review: Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

User Review  - Josh Smith - Goodreads

Some parts of this book were easier than others to read -- some were a breeze and were understandable for me, and others were complete hell. I got through it, though, and I came away with somewhat of ... Read full review

Review: Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

User Review  - Hrishabh Chaudhary - Goodreads

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that The Theory of Relativity is demanding and it is needless to say that you need to read it more than once. While there is a plethora of books on relativity ... Read full review

Contents

EINSTEINS FIRST THIRTYSEVEN YEARS
SPACE TIME AND LIGHT ALONG A RAILROAD
THE CONSTANT SPEED OF LIGHT
TIME BECOMES SLIPPERY
MASS AND ENERGY
ONWARD TO GENERAL RELATIVITY
GRAVITY BENDS LIGHT
COMING CLEAN ABOUT THE SPEED OF LIGHT
C DISPLACEMENT OF SPECTRAL LINES TOWARDS THE RED
A
D
F
G
H
M
N

SLITHERING IN SPACETIME
IMPROVING ON NEWTON
A COSMOLOGICAL SKETCH
GENERAL RELATIVITY STILL THRIVES
A MOTION OF THE PERIHELION OF MERCURY
B DEFLECTION OF LIGHT BY A GRAVITATIONAL FIELD
Q
S
T
W
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). He is best known in popular culture for his mass-energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation"). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect." The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory.

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